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The Weekly Star, January 2, 1920


Highlights of History from The Whitehorse Star, 1920-1929


Highlights of History from The Whitehorse Star

Explorer's Guides to Yukon Communities



1920

January

  • January 2, 1920: The famous old C.K.M. dredge No. 1, the first modern dredge in the country, is dismantled.
  • January 2, 1920: The Shand's roadhouse at the mouth of the Stewart River was destroyed by fire a few days ago.
  • January 2, 1920: A number of Dawson people will make the experiment of raising goats in the Yukon the coming season. Several goats already have been ordered, and some are already being cared for at the Carcross Indian School. A number will be kept there with hopes of eventually increasing the numbers to a large herd in time, while several other pairs will be brought to Dawson.
  • January 2, 1920: The worst wind and rain storm in 20 years raged in Skagway Wednesday afternoon and night. The steamer Tutshi was torn from its moorings and blown against the abutment of the railroad bridge but fortunately suffered no material damage.
  • January 9, 1920: Dick Fullerton, old prospector and trapper, was found dead on the shore of Kluane Lake on November 9, apparently from exposure. A month later, his remains have still not been buried, but instructions have been sent to Const. Vinall, now on Kluane patrol, to deal with the matter.
  • January 9, 1920: The last mail which reached here from Atlin the latter part of last week was as wet as though it had been through the ice at some point on the journey between here and there, as it most probably had.
  • January 9, 1920: The Skagway Alaskan reported on December 31st that J. M. Ruffner arrived from Atlin after a rather exciting trip over the ice. When the party started from Atlin the ice looked good but before they got across the lake they had broken through twice and the sled had to be left each time long enough to freeze in before they could lighten it and take off the mail, baggage, and ore samples from the quartz holdings he has been developing the last year or two.
  • January 16, 1920: Railroad Is Blockaded. Deep and Extensive Snowslides Cause Traffic to be Suspended - Operations Likely will not be Resumed Again for Several Days.
  • January 16, 1920: The Dawson News reported on December 31st that Maurice Linehan, an old time miner of the camp, was found dead in his cabin on Eighty pup, a tributary of Hunker creek. Evidently Mr. Linehan had gotten out of bed to put wood in the stove, and was seized with an attack of some kind, which caused him to drop dead on the floor. He had been dead three or four days when found.
  • January 16, 1920: Messrs. Goldthorpe, Bigger and Bolderson left Tuesday for Nine Mile post on the overland route to Dawson, to shovel out the snow that had drifted deeply across the road at that point.
  • January 23, 1920: It is announced that with the next election for the Yukon Council on February 25, the Yukon Council will be composed of three members instead of ten, and there will be three electoral districts instead of five.
  • January 23, 1920: Behind a six dog team driven by George Simmons of Carcross and accompanied by an Indian trail breaker, Albert Burch, San Francisco mining engineer who had been examining the Engineer mine, left Carcross last Thursday for Skagway. The snow way soft, deep and badly drifted in places and four days were consumed in making the journey of about 70 miles.
  • January 23, 1920: J. E. Binet, pioneer merchant and hotel man and owner of the townsite of Mayo, arrived in Whitehorse Tuesday from Dawson. He is very enthusiastic over the outlook for the Mayo silver-lead camp and believes it will become a permanent camp and perhaps, in time, one of the greatest producers of the white metal that has ever been discovered.
  • January 30, 1920: A week ago it looked as though through train service between Skagway and Whitehorse would be resumed at an early date, but this hope has been dissipated by the heavy fall of snow, the many new slides that have covered the track deep in places and the blizzard that has been raging almost uninterruptedly since on the south slope of the range, rendering it impossible for section and train crews to work out in the open.
  • January 30, 1920: H. F. Seeman, owner of the pioneer dairy in Skagway, had the misfortune a few days ago to have eleven of his sixteen cows condemned to death by the government inspector for being inoculated with tuberculosis. The sentence was carried out on Monday and meant a loss of about $2500 to Mr. Seeman, half of which amount, however, will be borne by the government.
  • January 30, 1920: A snowslide that hit the business section of Juneau on January 2nd instantly killed three people and injured eight others, of which one has since died. A large property loss was suffered by those owning houses in the track of the slide, which was about 100 feet wide.

February

  • February 6, 1920: The Dawson News reported on January 20th that a telegram received from London by Andrew Baird gave instructions to start work immediately hauling 3,000 cords of wood from Jensen creek to Dominion creek. The wood is to be used for thawing ground for the dredge which the North West Corporation is to install on the creek. The wood is all cut and ready for hauling.
  • February 6, 1920: Mrs. Margaret Mitchell, one of the best known mining women ever in the Klondike, who went outside last fall with the expectation of returning in the spring, is reported to have died in Ottumwa, Kansas, recently, at the age of 72.
  • February 6, 1920: A proclamation was issued in Ottawa on January 24th which brings into effect the amalgamation of the Dominion Police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as of February 1st.
  • February 13, 1920: Major R.E. Tucker, officer in command of the R.N.W.M.P. in the southern Yukon since last September, is appointed Superintendent, replacing Col. R. S. Knight in Dawson.
  • February 13, 1920: The Rev. Herbert Gilring, pioneer missionary to the Coppermine Eskimos, died of pneumonia in Ottawa on February 11th, at the age of 30. He was a great linguist, and in the short space of three years mastered the intricacies of that most difficult tongue, and had made good progress with translation.
  • February 13, 1920: Patsy Henderson, a native, formerly owner of a fox ranch at Ten Mile Point on Tagish lake, but who disposed of his holdings there a short time ago and has since been at Upper Lebarge, came into town Sunday and entered the Whitehorse General hospital for treatment of one of his eyes, which is in a highly inflamed state.
  • February 20, 1920: Not being able to procure blasting powder, Manager J. P. Whitney has been compelled to temporarily cease operations at the Copper King mine. A special shipment of powder from Juneau reached Skagway two weeks ago on the gas boat Hegg, but is still lying in that port until through traffic on the railway is resumed.
  • February 20, 1920: Ernie Johnson mushed down from his Wheaton district claims to Whitehorse the latter part of last week, there being so much snow there that he was unable to proceed with development work to any advantage. Before leaving for this place he built several shelter huts along the road from Robinson into the claims in which he is interested with Matthew Watson of Carcross.
  • February 20, 1920: The Dawson News reported on February 5th the death of Frank J. Nolan, one of the best known of Yukon's pioneer mining and business men. He died of pneumonia on January 31st at St. Anthony's hospital in Rock Island, Illinois.
  • February 27, 1920: The first through train between Whitehorse and Skagway since January 7 got into Skagway at 11:30 Wednesday night and the first outside mail to be received here since January 22 was due last night. The snow blockade on the White Pass railroad this winter has been the longest in duration and the most expensive since the building of the road.
  • February 27, 1920: In the February 25 election, Robert Lowe is elected representative of the Whitehorse district in the Yukon Council. He defeated Mr. French. In Dawson, Gavin Fowlie receives a majority over Edwards. In the Klondike district, Paul Hogan wins over McMillan.
  • February 27, 1920: Nick O’Brien of Carcross was expected in Whitehorse last night with a dog team loaded with three cases of powder for the Copper King mine. The shipment was brought from Skagway to Glacier by train, from there to Fraser by Bert Peterson with a dog team and from Fraser on by O’Brien.

March

  • March 5, 1920: In the Yukon Council election held on Feb. 25, Robert Lowe was the choice of the people in the Whitehorse district, Gavin Fowlie in the Dawson district and Paul Hogan in the Klondike district.
  • March 5, 1920: Lieut. Lyman M. Black, M. C., son of Capt. George Black, the former high commissioner of the Yukon Territory, left Vancouver recently for Ottawa to take up a commission in the permanent Canadian Machine Gun Corps.
  • March 5, 1920: The City Cafe and Bakery is to be reopened tomorrow by Geo. Yoshida, whose reputation as a first class cook is firmly established in Southern Yukon by his long activity therein, notably as chef at the Caribou hotel at Carcross and more recently as cook at the Copper King mine. Meals will be served at regular hours at prevailing prices, while board by the month has been placed at $55.
  • March 12, 1920: The Department of Public Works is calling for tenders for the freighting of supplies for the Yukon telegraph line between Hazelton and Atlin for the seasons of 1920-21-22.
  • March 12, 1920: Robert Lowe has advanced the price of wood from $1.00 to $2.00 per cord, according to length. We believe the other local wood dealers have followed suit. This has been made necessary by the increased cost of hay and feed for the horses employed in the business.
  • March 12, 1920: Among the forty or more passengers on last night's train were many White Pass employees, including 13 shipyards carpenters and Al Henderson the shipyards foreman.
  • March 19, 1920: There are many mild cases of influenza reported in Skagway, Carcross, Atlin and Whitehorse. The only death so far was in Atlin last Monday, when T. C. James, the druggist and postmaster, succumbed to the disease.
  • March 19, 1920: Major Fitz Horrigan, longtime member of the R.N.W.M.P., died March 3 in Honolulu.
  • March 19, 1920: Capt. W. J. Moorhead, the new commanding officer of the R. C. M. P. here, arrived from Vancouver on Saturday, accompanied by his wife. Capt. Moorhead, a comparatively young man, was born in the north of Ireland, and has been in the force ten years, four of which were spent overseas in the Great War as captain in charge of a Canadian field artillery battalion from Alberta.
  • March 26, 1920: Due to an influenza epidemic in Whitehorse, Carcross, Atlin and Skagway, a rigid quarantine is in effect for all persons traveling north from Whitehorse. People are required to stay five days in quarantine and are not allowed to get into contact with Indians.
  • March 26, 1920: Mrs. H. Emogene Hoagg, who was in Whitehorse last fall lecturing on Bahaism, will sail from America for Italy May 1, accompanied by Mrs. Ralston, a co-worker. They will work in Italy on behalf of their religion for an indefinite period. Before going to Italy they hope to go to Haifa, Palestine, the headquarters of Abdul Baha, the head of their movement, to confer with him respecting their work.
  • March 26, 1920: An Indian boy named Paul McGinty, a pupil at the Chooutla school at Carcross, died early yesterday morning from influenza. It was reported in last week's paper that all the students and teachers at the school except the principal and one teacher were suffering from the disease.

April

  • April 2, 1920: Kate Carmack died March 29, 1920 in Carcross from pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. She was about 50 years old.
  • April 2, 1920: Following up on a report of some influenza deaths, police went to a camp on Lake Laberge. They found Selkirk Jim, about 55 years old, his wife and his mother were all dead, and his 7-year-old daughter was in a tent alone, very ill. The bodies of the dead were taken to the Jim Boss roadhouse, where they still lie awaiting burial, while the little girl and eight other Indians who were found to be infected with influenza, among whom were Jim Boss' family, were brought to town and placed in the Whitehorse General hospital, where they were so well taken care of that they have all since recovered and left that institution.
  • April 2, 1920: Due to the fact that Canadian silver coin is taken at par in the United States, the silver coin becomes scarce in Whitehorse and its use is discontinued.
  • April 9, 1920: The Dawson News reported on March 25 that the North West corporation has secured a second large dredge for its operations on Dominion creek, and will put it to work at Granville, 55 miles from Dawson. It is the same size and type of dredge as now being operated in this camp by the Yukon Gold company, namely, a close-connected Bucyrus dredge of seven and a half cubic foot buckets, with daily capacity of 5,000 cubie yards. The same company now is hauling another dredge to No. 17 Dominion where it will be set up mmediately and it is planned to have it start operations July 15.
  • April 9, 1920: A consignment of 100 gallons of brandy and Scotch whiskey, ordered from Vancouver some time ago by Gold Commissioner G. P. Mackenzie for use in Yukon territory for medical purposes, reached Skagway on board the Princess Mary on her last voyage. There are quite a number of invalids in Whitehorse who have been anxiously awaiting the coming of this shipment. The goods are being held at Skagway on account of the extreme danger of trying to forward them across the line without the protection of an armed escort.
  • April 9, 1920: Men are now going to Mayo to work on the dredge which is being assembled on No. 65 Highet creek, and will work up stream from that point. It will start work about June 1. It is a five and a half foot bucket dredge, built in Scotland, and for several years was on the MeQuesten river. The new operating company is the L. Titus company. Twenty to thirty men will be engaged there on spring construction.
  • April 16, 1920: Mrs. Laura Gertrude Clarke, wife of W. B. Clarke, M. D., died at the Whitehorse General hospital on Tuesday of pneumonia following a virulent attack of influenza. Mrs. Clarke had lately given birth to a son, and had not regained her normal strength when taken down with the prevailing epidemic. Dr. Clarke purposes leaving Whitehorse on Tuesday's train with his two sons, Waldo and Somerset, and will take the remains east to Newmarket, Ont., for interment in his family plot.
  • April 16, 1920: A.C. Bonebrake and Jack McLean mushed in from 100 Mile Landing on the Hootalinqua, arriving Saturday evening, having broken trail and made the trip in six days. Bonebrake and his partner Abe Henson have a prospect on Iron creek, twenty-five miles over the mountain from Hootalinqua, and have spent the winter dog-hauling supplies and machinery to their prospect. The lure of the wild has put vitality into Bonebrake, for he has the color of an Indian and the grip of a blacksmith's vice.
  • April 16, 1920: Dentist Dr. L. S. Keller has concluded arrangements to enlarge and renovate his premises. There will be three commodious rooms, one of which will be a handsomely furnished and fitted up reception room, another will be used in the performance of his professional duties and will be supplied with all the latest and most up-to-date paraphernalia and instruments known in modern dentistry, while the third will be a sleeping apartment.
  • April 23, 1920: It is reported about town that there has been a big slump in the fur market, running all the way from 20 to 50 or more per cent. from last sales. The big New York sale is now on, and all lines show a remarkable drop in values. As unprecedented prices have jbeen paid for all classes of pelts during the past few months, those who have bought heavily stand to lose heavily. World conditions have been such as to make this drop inevitable.
  • April 23, 1920: The White Pass will not be entering a bid on the winter mail service between Whitehorse and Dawson. Just what developments may result it is impossible to say, but the days of the fancy fast service to Dawson are over. The company is at present operating seven of the roadhouses along the trail, but it is impossible to say at this time what disposition will be made of them.
  • April 23, 1920: Development work lately carried on at the Copper King has resulted in opening the richest lead in the history of the mine, rich both in quality and quantity.
  • April 30, 1920: Among the items in the report of the library committee: The rooms of the librarian have been repapered and calcimined. The librarian was given two weeks' holiday with pay. And it was found necessary to engage the services of Mr. George Ryder, and for the sum of $5 a month he inspects the stove, turns out the light and locks the library up for the night at 11 p. m.
  • April 30, 1920: The Yukon Council on April 27th passed a prohibition bill, to become effective May 29 next. No importation for sale of beverages will be permitted in the meantime. The new bill permits preseriptions for medicinal purposes of eight ounces each and provides for the sale of liquors for mechanical and sacramental purposes.
  • April 30, 1920: The Powers Tours of Chicago, engaged in the business of personally conducted tours of excursionists through Alaska and the Yukon, has issued a neat folder giving the itinerary of their trips for 1920. It includes two photos of Whitehorse; a general view of the town, and one of the White Pass hotel, with a group of tourists and Mrs. Viaux, the proprietor, standing in front.

May

  • May 7, 1920: All owners of bicycles are hereby notified that on and after this date they will be liable to prosecution for riding on any of the sidewalks within the town limits. By order of R.C.M.P.
  • May 7, 1920: The river opened in front of Whitehorse early Saturday morning. The break now extends down stream for about six miles. It is thought by those best qualified to express an opinion that Lake Lebarge will break up about the 10th of June.
  • May 7, 1920: A new 64-foot, fast, light draft utility launch is now building at the B. Y. N. shipyards at Whitehorse. It will be equipped for handling a limited number of passengers, mail and between 30 and 40 tons of freight. Its home port will be at Tanana and Capt. Baker will act as pilot. The boat has not yet been named.
  • May 14, 1920: Herman W. Vance, for years manager of the Conrad properties at Conrad and Carcross, has accepted a position with the company that is to operate the Rainy Hollow copper mines which are under bond from Martin Conway and his associates, and will now see to the operation of the two caterpillar tractors that will be up on the first big freighter. These monsters of fifteen tons will be used to transport the machinery and supplies to the mines and bring the ore back for shipment to the smelter.
  • May 14, 1920: A organization is formed in Whitehorse to put preventive measures into effect against the breeding of mosquitoes. T. C. Richards, of P. Burns & Co., offered to furnish 200 gallons of crude oil at 17½c per gallon, and to donate $5.00 in cash. Upon suggestion of E. J. Hamacher it was decided to use sawdust, which had been soaked in crude oil mixed with a small percentage of kerosene, to scatter over areas of swamp land and the surface of ponds and_potholes of water where such measures could be followed out effectively.
  • May 14, 1920: The sale of liquors in Whitehorse by physicians's prescription is discontinued May 8. The gold commissioner stated that he did not approve of an indiscriminate traffic in booze as a beverage under the nom de plume of "medicinal purposes," and had therefore put his foot down upon the habit, for such it had in reality become.
  • May 21, 1920: Sergeant Mapley of the R. C. M. P., stationed at Summit as assistant inspector for several years past, and Const. Blaate, stationed at Carcross for some time, came down to Whitehorse Saturday to take their final discharge from the foree, their time of service having expired. Sergt. Mapley is retiring on pension after 36 years service. He has been in Yukon since 1898 and has been one of the most efficient and valued officers in the force. Const. Blaate returned to Carcross, at which place he will make_his home.
  • May 21, 1920: The territorial poll tax is now due. All men of the age of 18 years upwards are subject to the tax, and each must pay the sum of $8. The reduced poll tax fee of $5 and the alteration in age provided by the Yukon Council last month are not effective this year.
  • May 21, 1920: Supt. W. D. Gordon of the B. Y. N. reports an unusual number of applications for hotel and steamer reservations for the coming tourist season. Also many inquiries from big game hunters who are anxious to spend a few weeks in the wilderness where moose, caribou, mountain sheep and grizzly bears hold sway.
  • May 28, 1920: The miners in the Copper King have run across a sixteen inch vein of high grade molybdenite ore running through the big body of high grade copper ore in which they are now working. We are informed that molybdenite when refined is valued at about 75c a pound, while copper brings less than a third of that.
  • May 28, 1920: Dr. Mellow, M & M Dentists, states: After making the trip to Whitehorse under large expense, we find the dental law enacted at Dawson this spring places us as outlaws, and therefore makes it impossible for us to unpack our trunk.
  • May 28, 1920: During the past week some substantial poles, 20 feet high, have been erected in the school playground. Swings, rings and horizontal bar will be added, and it is intended to provide parallel bars as well. Owing to the recent sickness among so many of the scholars, parents and friends must not expect so large a display at the sports day as last year.

June

  • June 4, 1920: A meeting of the Yukon Rifle association was held on Tuesday evening at Hamacher's store for the purposes of reorganization. Capt. Moorhead was elected Captain and F. G. Berton Secretary-Treasurer. Practice days will be every Saturday at 2 p. m., members to meet at Hamacher’s store for the purpose of obtaining rifles and ammunition, and such other thes ay at jeast five members can be got together. Of these one at least must be familiar with the rules of the range and the care of arms. When the new rifles arrive, which are expected very shortly, they will be allotted to the members so that each man can always shoot with the same rifle.
  • June 4, 1920: Billy Armstrong came in from Champagne Landing Thursday of last week for the purpose of making arrangements for the expeditious handling of a party of big game kunters he is expecting to arrive early in August and to whom he is under contract to act as guide into the heads of the Donjek and White rivers. While here he bought ten of the Royal Mail service horses.
  • June 4, 1920: Mr. and Mrs. D. Alguire, pioneers of the southern Yukon and roadhouse keepers at Nordenskold on the winter trail between Whitehorse and Dawson, arrived in town Saturday, and will leave in a few day fer Chehalis, Wash., where it is possible that they will make their future home.
  • June 11, 1920: On June 9, the I.O.D.E.'s monument for the soldiers of World War I, the work of A.E. Henderson, is unveiled.
  • June 11, 1920: Last Friday's train brought in a shipment of eight autos consigned to dealers on Lower Yukon river towns.
  • June 11, 1920: The annual meeting of the Southern Yukon Automobile Club will be held Wednesday evening in the court room. Alt motorists and those interested in better roads are invited to attend.
  • June 18, 1920: Whitehorse is selected as a landing point for the international aeroplane trial flight from Minnealo, N.Y. to Nome, Alaska. The four planes land in Whitehorse August 15, and again on their return journey, on September 5.
  • June 18, 1920: Bishop Stringer, after an absence of twenty-one months in Canada, England, France and Belgium, returned lately to Yukon. After a lengthy visit at the Indian school, Carcross, and a few days at Whitehorse, he left for Dawson on the steamer White Horse Monday night, accompanied by Mrs. Stringer. In the party also are W. D. Young, late of Champagne Landing, who is bound for the Arctic coast for the third time, Capt. the Rev. F. H. Buck, M.C., and Mrs. Buck, destined for Mayo and the mining camps of Northern Yukon; Miss Brewster of Carcross, on a holiday trip to Dawson, in charge of two Indian girls returning to their homes after eight years in school.
  • June 18, 1920: About three weeks ago John Joe, an Indian hunter, caught two black bear cubs near Alligator lake, back of Cowley station on the White Pass railway. The other day John Joe sold the cubs, which are between seven and eight weeks old, to a man named Bowers of Whitehorse. Bowers hopes that he can dispose of the animals at a profit to some tourist visiting the Yukon this summer.
  • June 25, 1920: Mrs. Jas. Brown died at her home in Dawson on the morning of June 3, as the result of an apoplectic stroke. She went to Dawson from Tacoma, Wash., with her husband in the summer of 1898. Interment will be had at Vancouver, B. C.
  • June 25, 1920: Capt. Le Royer of the Canadian Air Board will leave this morning for Skagway. While there he will make arrangements for an emergency landing station for the airplanes which will take part in the transcontinental fight, on the Dyea farm of Mrs. Harriet Pullen. An emergency station on that side of the coast range will be necessary in the event of a heavy fog coming up at the time the airplanes are ready to cross the divide into the interior.
  • June 25, 1920: The news contained in recent issues of San Francisco papers telling of the formation of two gigantic oil companies, the capitalization of the two together being $3,500,000, would indicate that some actual development work would soon be done in the Alaskan oil fields. With that much money to be spent, the fields should be thoroughly tried out, and if found to contain sufficient quantities of high grade oil, put on a producing basis.
  • June 25, 1920: Robert Lowe is advertising 16-foot pole wood for $8.50 per cord, 4-foot wood for $9.50 per cord, 32-inch wood for $13.00 per cord and 16-inch wood for $14.00 per cord.

July

  • July 2, 1920: Dog Poisoners Abroad. Within the last few days several valuable dogs have lost their lives in and around Whitehorse through having eaten something containing strychnine.
  • July 2, 1920: Yukon Councillor Robert Lowe went to Champagne Landing the fore part of the week with Bob Palmer, who was taking out an auto load of roadhouse supplies to that place for "Shorty" Chambers. Mr. Lowe's object in making the trip was to inspect the government road between here and there in order to make repairs where needed. He found a number of mudholes, as well as several culverts and bridges that needed fixing, and has arranged with the settlers using the road to do the repair work on their frequent trips to and from Whitehorse.
  • July 2, 1920: Wednesday morning the steamer Casca pulled into Whitehorse on her return from Fort Yukon with 85 excursionists who had made the trip down the river to view the midnight sun. The visitors spent several hours at Fort Yukon and saw the midnight sun make the complete circuit of the skies above the Arctic Circle. Capt J. O. Williams was in command of the Casca.
  • July 9, 1920: Word reached Whitehorse a few days ago of the probable drowning in Wolfe river canyon on June 3 of Joseph La Salle, trapper and big game hunters' guide. Wolfe river is a tributary of the Nasutlin river that empties into Teslin lake on the northeast shore near Teslin Post. Wolfe river canyon is filled with boulders and has several falls over which the rushing torrent that flows between its walls drops sheer for fifteen or more feet. The finding of La Salle's canoe, smashed into kindling wood, at the foot of the canyon and his dogs roaming around in the near vicinity, leaves small room for doubt that the daring adventurer, who was only about 35 years of age and noted for his reckless courage and agility, had lost his life in an attempt to negotiate this dangerous piece of water.
  • July 9, 1920: The U.S. transport Gen. Jacobs returned to Whitehorse the fore part of the week from a round trip to Dawson. She took down to Dawson a large shipment of gasoline, oil and four airplane engines, all for use in connection with the New York-to-Nome air flight which is to take place within a few days. Thirty-four drums of gasolie and 200 gallons of oil were left in Dawson for the machines to take aboard at that point. The remainder of the supplies were shipped down the river on the U. S. transport Jeff Davis, whch connected with the Jacobs at Dawson. The engines are for use in case any of the planes break down.
  • July 9, 1920: Tony Cyr, in charge of a government road gang composed of Mike Cyr, W. Ladoure, Jack French, Bob Earle, Geo. Taylor and Chas Ennis, left Saturday morning with their tools, provisions and camp equipment for the vicinity of Cowley station on the White Pass railroad, where they will put in the next few weeks in working on the government road and in repairing old culverts and bridges and putting in new ones where needed to make the highway so that it can be traveled over in safety and comfort by owners of motor cars and other vehicles.
  • July 16, 1920: Word was received in Whitehorse yesterday that the great international transcontinental airplane flight from Mineola Field, N. Y., to. Nome, Alaska, had started. It is impossible, for many reasons, to predict the time of the birdmen's arrival in Whitehorse, but barring accidents and foggy weather, the planes ought to get here by next Thursday.
  • July 16, 1920: Charley Baxter, big game hunters' guide, returned Thursday of last week from Vancouver, B. C., bringing wth him 25 head of pack horses, 12 of which were for Shorty Austen, of Carcross, another big game hunters' guide.
  • July 16, 1920: The Juneau Empire reported on July 6 that William Martin, well known attorney of Seattle, arrived in Juneau on the steamer Alameda Sunday afternoon. He stated that he is here in the interests of the 140 claimants for damages against the Canadian Pacific Railway company growing out of the Princess Sophia disaster in 1918. He also said that efforts are now being made to prevent the Canadian Pacific people from obtaining an order of "limitation of liability" which would prevent collection of full damages. Claims made by the persons whom Mr. Martin represents amount to approximately $1,500,000.
  • July 23, 1920: M. D. Snodgrass, superintendent of the agricultural experimental station at Fairbanks, arrived in Whitehorse the latter part of last week with six head of live stock, consisting of two bulls and two cows from the Galloway herd of cattle at the U.S. agricultural experimental station at Kodiak, and a bull and a cow yak from the herd of these animals at Banff. He is taking these animals into the interior for the purpose of cross-breeding them in the hope of producing a hardy species of cattle that will be able not only to withstand the rigors of the winters in the great northland, but prove profitable to their owners for dairy and other uses.
  • July 23, 1920: Billy Armstrong got in from the Kluane lake country a few days ago and says that on July 7, while camped at the junction of Calden and Lake creeks, he experienced the most exciting and longest-drawn-out earthquake of his life. It continued throughout an entire night and part of the next day. There were between 40 and 50 distinct shocks, immediately following each of which there was a sharp report as though from an explosion of some gaseous matter.
  • July 23, 1920: Dr. Carr of Winnipeg, who had accepted the position of medical health officer for Southern Yukon district and arrived here three weeks ago to take charge, tendered his resignation to Gold Commissioner Geo. P. McKenzie a few days ago. His resignation was accepted and he left yesterday, aecompanied by jhis wife, on his return to his former home.
  • July 30, 1920: At a meeting of the Whitehorse General hospital board, chairman W. L. Phelps laid out all the facts concerning the financial status of the hospital. He pointed out that during the past year the board had been very much concerned with the accumulating debts brought about by circumstances over which they had no control. Food, drugs and other necessities had increased in price, but the income had diminished. The board, after anxious and prolonged deliberation, believed that the hospital could be freed from debt if drastic changes were made, such as stopping the issue of hospital tickets and causing every patient to pay in full both hospital and doctor's fees.
  • July 30, 1920: There are rumors circulating in Whitehorse of extensive high grade silver-lead deposits having been recently uncovered in the Mayo district, but as the stories can be traced to no authentic source it will be well for our readers to not place too much reliance upon them.
  • July 30, 1920: Under the capable management of Wm. Garrett and wife, the Atlin Inn, the White Pass tourist hotel at Atlin, B. C., is becoming one of the most popular hostelries in the entire northland.

August

  • August 6, 1920: Yukon M.P. Dr. Alfred Thompson asked the government on July 30th to install a wireless station costing $40,000 at a new silver camp near Mayo in the Stewart river district, to maintain communication with Alaskan stations.
  • August 6, 1920: Four or five autos loaded with young people went out to the Takini roadhouse Monday night to enjoy the hospitality of Jimmy Adams, the genial proprietor of that popular resort. The evening was spent in dancing.
  • August 6, 1920: The steamer Thistle, which left Whitehorse July 11 for Taylor, Drury, Pedlar & Co.'s trading post at Ross river, a tributary of the Pelly, was unable to reach her destination on account of low water, and was forced to lay up at a point 12 miles this side of the place for which she was headed. As the distance between the place where the Thistle is stranded and Selkirk, the nearest point where wire communication with Whitehorse could be had, is between two and three hundred miles, word was slow in reaching here, and in consequence considerable anxiety was felt when the boat became several days overdue.

September

  • September 3, 1920: Klondike camps are on top of the list of gold producers for 1920.
  • September 3, 1920: The Copper King mine closes down September 1st.

October

  • October 1, 1920: The St. Paul's Hostel, a school home for Yukon children, opens in Dawson.
  • October 15, 1920: George T. Coffey is appointed resident manager of Yukon Gold for Dawson and vicinity.
  • October 15, 1920: This issue had several articles about big game hunting - you can read three of them here.
  • October 22, 1920: 1920 is the most disastrous season in the history of the British Yukon Navigation company, due to abnormally low water and early heavy frosts.

November

  • November 5, 1920: When the White Pass train pulled out yesterday morning, most of the town was at the station, about ninety or more as outgoing passengers, and the remainder to take a more or less lengthy leave of them. Despite the late date, beautiful weather prevailed, and those who remained looked almost pityingly on those destined to the moister climate of the Pacific coast. They will be turning their faces north with the birds again in the spring.
  • November 5, 1920: Navigation on the Yukon river closed with the arrival here last Sunday night of the steamer White Horse, which brought back from Hootalinqua and Lower Lebarge the crews of the Canadian and Nasutlin. The steamer Tutshi arrived at Carcross on Tuesday, which was the last trip on the Atlin run this season. The White Pass company has been handicapped by the most severe weather and water conditions ever experienced in the north. Extreme low water and heavy ice made it impossible to let many of the boats to their regular winter quarters.
  • November 5, 1920: Angus Meleod, mate on the Casca, will be stationed at Lower Lebarge this winter to look after the fleet there. Ewen Morrison, mate on the Selkirk, will act as watchman on the steamer Canadian at Hootalinqua. A. M. McLeod, mate on the Nasutlin, will winter at Stewart and look after the Selkirk at that point.

December

  • December 24, 1920: The Carnegie library at Dawson was destroyed by fire on December 15. On December 17, 2 workmen thawing pipes in the Northern Commercial company store at Dawson started a blaze in the second story of the building. Two rooms were gutted by the flames, and considerable damage was done by water.
  • The gas boat Diana, owned by Chas. Goldstein of Juneau, which has been missing since it left its home port carrying a load of supplies for the Chichagoff mine on November 30th, is probably lost, and it is believed that the crew of three men have perished. The captain of the Peterson from Fort William H. Seward made a careful search without result. He gives as his opinion that the Diana struck an iceberg and sank immediately.
  • December 24, 1920: If plans now under way by the Dominion Air Board for consideration are matured, Canadian geologists, who every summer make arduous trips to far northern regions to carry on field work, will next summer be spared much effort, and save several weeks of valuable time by being carried in airships.
  • December 31, 1920: Is there nobody in town to represent our absent councilor Robert Lowe? If there be, we are sure he will receive the thanks of every citizen if he will bestir himself and get side walks cleared of snow, or at least get most of it leveled down. In Dawson, a man with horse and plough goes over all side walks every morning after a fresh snow fall. Is it not possible for us here to have a similar arrangements?
  • December 31, 1920: The launch Diana, reported lost between Juneau and Chichagoff, has been located. A broken tail shaft put the craft out of commission and she was driven ashore on Lemesner island. The gasboat Dauntless found her.
  • December 31, 1920: The children of Christ Church Sunday school entertained their parents and friends in a splendid manner at the I. 0. D. E. rooms on Wedndsday night, the occasion being the annual Christmas Tree festival. Archdeacon Whittaker reported the Sunday school to be in a flourishing condition, the average Sunday attendance having increased from 16 in 1919 to 18 in 1920, despite an unusual amount of sickness and other interruptions during the year.

1921

January

  • January 7, 1921: A crew of men left Dawson several days ago to dismantle two units of the Twelvemile hydro-electric power plant of the Yukon Gold company. The third and last unit may be left intact, and used the coming summer. Should it be decided to remove it this winter, other power will he used in driving the Gold Run dredge next summer. The units being removed are to be sent to Malay, where Yukon Gold has large tin dredging operations under way.

February

  • February 4, 1921: R. B. Hyett, White Pass baggageman, is able to walk again, after being confined for three months in a hospital as a result of injuries sustained in an accident last fall. Hyett was taking friends for a drive into the country and, stopping for a brief rest, parked the car beside the road. A woman who was learning to drive came along and drove her car into Hyett's machine. Hyett was knocked down and received two fractures in his leg.
  • February 4, 1921: At the Sophia hearing now being conducted in Seattle, Marine Superintendent Neurotsos of the C. P. R. testified that Captain Locke's running at full speed in a blinding show storm was unwise. Harrigan, formerly first mate on the U.S. lighthouse tender Cedar, testified that all of the Sophia passengers could have been rescued if Captain Locke had granted permission, as all arrangements had been made by the Cedar to take care of them.
  • February 4, 1921: Aultman Bros, of Akron, Ohio, prominent operators in the Rainy Hollow district, will bring engineers here within the next three months to examine the mines in this vicinity, and will make a thorough examination of the Copper King at that time. The Granby interests were here last summer but despite a good report, they recently wired that present low copper prices prohibit proceeding with a purchase.

March

  • March 4, 1921: Word has been received of the death at Carmacks of "Babe," the black cob used by Taylor & Drury as the delivery horse before the days of the Cadillae. Old Babe has been kept at the Taylor, Drury, Pedlar & Co. post at Carmacks as a pensioner for several years, the firm not having the heart to destroy him after his many years of faithful service.
  • March 4, 1921: Skagway Undertaking Parlors. Suffecool & Itjen, proprietors. Bert Whitfeld, embalmer. Bodies prepared for shipment. Careful attention given ll cases.
  • March 4, 1921: The last mail brought word of a well known official of the earlier days in Southern Yukon - Percy Reid, who was mining recorder at Carcross for years. Mr. Reid is chief inspector of immigration for Canada, and also assistant controller of Chinese immigration. He sailed from Vancouver for the Orient on the Empress of Asia on February 10, on official business, and expects to be away for three months or more.

April

  • April 1, 1921 Federal grants for the Yukon are cut in half in 1921.

May

  • May 20, 1921 Yukon Council passes a resolution that favours telegraphic communication with Mayo.

June

  • June 3, 1921: On May 29, a serious fire damages the White Pass Hotel, but the damage is soon repaired.
  • June 3, 1921: "The Northern Commercial Company has sold its Dawson business to a new company comprised of former employes of the company. The new firm will be known as the J. A. Donald company."
  • June 17, 1921: With this issue the Star appears under new management. A joint stock company is in process of organization and when completed will take over the business and property pertaining to the Weekly Star. Practically all of the prominent business men of the town have taken stock in the new enterprise and the continuation of the publication is now assured. When the former owner, E. J. White, was here a couple of weesk ago, it was for the purpose of either selling the plant or closing it down. As no individual willing to purchase could, on the spur of the moment, be found, the only alternative was a community enterprise which has been successfully launched.
  • June 17, 1921: "Wednesday evening reminded one that summer was here indeed, as the train brought over a large number of tourists - the first real crowd of the season. As usual, there were quite a few pretty girls and all places of vantage, such as the empty trucks at the depot, the lumber piles on the wharf, etc., were crowded with practically the entire male population of Whitehorse, who spend many such pleasant summer evenings viewing and discussing the latest styles from the outside. All the dogs of town seem, to realize the tourists are here, and congregate on Front street, where each and every tourist must needs stop and rave over them. The girls pet and fondle them and call them all sorts of endearing names, much to the disgust of the envious men mentioned above."
  • June 24, 1921: Editor of The Weekly Star is now Mrs. E. L. Wilson.

July

  • July 1, 1921: Principally through the efforts of the Yukon Councilman Robt. Lowe the department of the interior has been prevailed upon to allow oil stampeders to record their claims in Whitehorse on their return from Fort Norman, saving a long expensive trip to Edmonton, which was necessary under the old rules. The Yukon is recognized by all as the best possible winter route to Fort Norman and now that claims may be registered here it is certain that next winter will see a big stampede through Whitehorse for the great oil attraction.
  • July 1, 1921: Word received in the mail last evening states that Capt. Janney, well known Canadian aviator, is on his way here to look after the establishment of an aerial passenger and freight service to Ft. Norman oil fields from Whitehorse and Dawson. He expects that his machines will make the trip each way in one day. He will also visit Lake Atlin, with a view of establishing a flying boat service there for summer tourist season.
  • July 1, 1921: Keller Bros. have acquired the park Herman Grimm commenced in Skagway a few years. ago The trees have been pruned, the vines trimmed, and tourists can enjoy the novelty of dancing in a real Alaskan park.
  • July 15, 1921: In a plebiscite on July 11, Yukoners express that they want the right to import their liquor when they want it instead of abolition of liquor imports.
  • July 30, 1921 The new dredge No. 2 starts operation on Dominion creek fifty miles from Dawson.

August

  • August 5, 1921: All the stampeders are back from Searfoss Creek at Little Atlin Lake, and a list of some of the claims staked is published. The strike had been reported in the July 30th edition as being on Darud Creek.
  • August 12, 1921: Frank Dickinson, 24 years of age, one of the crew of the steamer Casca, lost his life in the icy waters of the Yukon while the boat was about 15 miles south of Minto on her return trip to Whitehorse on August 8th. He was washing railings when he apparently lost his footing. See two articles and more information here.

September

  • September 2, 1921: Managing Editor of The Weekly Star is E. Chester Roberts, Editor is Mrs. E.L. Wilson.
  • September 16, 1921: It is almost a certainty that there will be a general election in Canada before the next session of Parliament and from Premier Meighen's remarks a December election is quite probable.
  • September 16, 1921: The Liquor Ordinance becomes effective September 15th, providing for the establishment of Government liquor stores and the sale of liquors. The Government stores shall remain open not more than eight hours in the twenty-four and not later at any time than seven o'clock in the evening. Stores are to operated in Whitehorse, Dawson and Mayo. The bill also provides for a tax of two cents per pint on all near beer sold in the Territory and imposes severe penalties for any violation of this law.
  • September 16, 1921: R. H. Palmer who has conducted a store and jitney business here for some time has left for Mayo where he will open a similar business. He built a good sized boat fo carry his outfit in, the motive power being his Ford truck, but owing to difficulty with his gear he has left the outfit here and will use it next spring in taking in new stock.
  • September 23, 1921: The White Pass steamer Nasutlin which has been on the Stewart City-Mayo run this year and which has recently been engaged in removing rocks from the upper Stewart channel was wrecked a few days ago. It appears that while at this work some part of the gear broke and the steamer struck a rock which sunk her.
  • September 23, 1921: Dr. Alfred Thompson, Yukon's member of parliament, announces to retire from public life and to resume his medical career.
  • September 23, 1921: Three cars loaded with people, food, and guns left for Carcross last Saturday afternoon for a sightseeing and hunting outing.
  • September 23, 1921: T. C. Richards, White Horse representative of P. Burns & Co. Ltd., arrived in Mayo on September 12th, after a trip of 16 days across country from Selkirk with a bunch of cattle for that camp. He left the cattle 9 miles south of Mayo and pushed on through the forrest with his horse in order to get food for the party. He reports that out of a total of thirty head of cattle with which he started, four strayed away in a snow storm on a summit when five days out from Selkirk and were not found again.
  • September 30, 1921: Managing Editor of The Weekly Star is E. Chester Roberts, and Mrs. E.L. Wilson is gone from the header.
  • September 30, 1921: We feel that an apology is necessary for the issue of last week. There were many errors in it and several news items of local interest were left out. There wore several good reasons for this. In the first place our gasoline engine is out of commission and only having electric motive power to use made us work all night part of the time. Then we got in some new parts for the machine and one of them, the pot mouthpiece, simply decided that it would not work. Consequently we were a day late and did not read proof or anything. However, things are moving more smoothly now and we think that this present issue is much more like it should be.
  • September 30, 1921: About a week ago J. W. Wilson, fuel agent for the White Pass, took Frank Dumontier as his engineer on the Hawk, one of the staunchest little craft on the river, and started down the stream to make a final inspection and pay off trip for the various wood camps along the line. In some way they struck one of the rocks in Five Finger Rapids and the boat was smashed and the two men were presumedly lost, as no trace has been found of them.

October

  • October 14, 1921: The name of the pioneer company Taylor, Drury, Pedlar & Company, Limited, is being changed to Taylor & Drury, Limited.
  • October 21, 1921: George Black, living in Vancouver now but one of the best known men in the territory, is unanimously nominated by the Liberal Conservative convention to run for M.P.
  • October 21, 1921: Last Sunday, C. Atherton took two young men to Ice Lake with a canoe, to snag some grouse and ducks. One of the men on shore fired at a duck as it flew past the canoe with the other two men in it. The duck was not hit but both men were hit with shot. Dr. Culbertson extracted most of the shot but the patient will need to go to Vancouver for x-rays to find the rest.
  • October 21, 1921: The steamer Dawson on its last trip north had a very unique experience when she steamed for hours past great herds of caribou. The officers of the steamer report the animals were everywhere along both banks from Thistle Creek to Ogilvie, a distance of fully forty-five miles.
  • October 28, 1921: Liquor runners, operating on a large scale, and boot-leggers, in league with exceedingly clever counterfeiters, are flooding the Northwest, especially Seattle, Tacoma and Spokane, with thousands of dollars in bogus $10 federal reserve notes, it was made known today through Captain W. R. Jarrell of the United States secret service. Money transactions in illicit deals for large quantities of liquor make the passing of counterfeit money easy, Captain Jarrell said, and virtually impossible to trace. The counterfeit notes are more easily passed on Canadian dealers, who furnish liquor runners with their stocks for transportation to Seattle, operatives said, inasmuch as the Canadians are comparatively unfamiliar with American bills.

November

  • November 18, 1921: first edition with the title "The Whitehorse Weekly Star".

    The Whitehorse Weekly Star, November 18, 1921

December

  • December 9, 1921: In one of the hardest fought elections, George Black wins the election for Yukon M.P., defeating Congdon and Pitts.
  • Editor and Manager of The Whitehorse Weekly Star is now E. Chester Roberts.
  • December 23, 1921: Owing to the fact that the editor has important business in Skagway, and as there is no one available to do his work, the Star will be forced to miss one issue, that of the 30th of December. This is very regrettable as the Star has missed but one other issue in the last twenty-two years.
  • December 23, 1921: Dr. Culbertson in consultation with two other physicians, decided it would be better to send J. Richards outside to a Vancouver hospital, as the wound in his foot is too serious for local treatment. It is hoped Jimmy's foot can be saved from amputation.
  • December 23, 1921: The body of an unknown Canadian soldier is to be brought from the western battlefront and buried beneath the Victory Tower of the new Parliament Building in Ottawa.



The online newspaper archives has no issues of the Star between December 23, 1921 and March 21, 1924. It may have not been printed for that period.



1924

March

  • March 21, 1924: The Weekly Star resumes publication after a suspension of several months, with a new title design. The reason for the suspension was financial issues. The Publisher is now J.D. Skinner.
    The Weekly Star (Whitehorse, Y.T.), March 21, 1924

  • March 21, 1924: After 26 years with the White Pass & Yukon Route railway and the government telegraph service, George S. Fleming retires. He and Mrs. Fleming left for California but have not decided where the future will take them.
  • March 21, 1924: "During February Inspector Moorhead and Corporal Cronkhite made a general patrol of the Kluahne district, making the round trip of over four hundred miles in twenty-three days. Their supplies were carried by a train of six dogs. Conditions generally throughout the district were found to be good. The Indians were in good health and prosperous. ... Last year the Jacquot's erected a bridge over the Jarvis river, thereby permitting automobile traffic from Whitehorse to Kiuahne Lake, a distance of one hundred andjfifty-one miles."

April

  • April 4, 1924: "Andrew Sostad, from the Engineer Mine, spent a few days in Carcross and Skaguay last week on business connected with the mine. He reports development work progressing and prospects favorable. He purposes soon to increase his force of men."

May

  • June 6, 1924: The navigation season opens. The steamer Casca, with the barge A.B. Shay in tow, is the first boat to leave Whitehorse for Dawson on June 2.

June

  • June 6, 1924: The last section of the dam is opened May 31. The dam was designed to store water in Marsh Lake, Lake Tagish, and all its branches, and Lake Bennett. By releasing the water early in May it is expected that Lake LeBarge is open earlier permitting steamers to navigate earlier.

August

  • August 1, 1924: Otto Partridge of Ben-My-Chree called in at The Star office. The White Pass excursions to Ben-My-Chree have become very popular, and last year over 2,000 people visited.
  • August 8, 1924: The Pavilion Grounds at Whitehorse Rapids, constructed in June/July of this year, are named Robert Service Camp after our famous bard.

September

  • September 12, 1924: Through the persistent efforts of Robert Lowe, the Dominion Government arranges to transfer a number of buffalo from the park at Wainwright, Alberta to the Yukon.

October

  • October 3, 1924: The liquor store re-opened October 1st after being closed for a few months due to a lack of supply. Pending the ratification of the treaty making provision for the bringing in of liquor through American Territory a supply has been admitted with the permission of the American authorities for medicinal purposes. In other provinces some members of the medical profession have left themselves open to much adverse criticism because of the liberality with which they issued prescriptions, and because of the fortunes some of them accumulated in this way. Whitehorse will not be a target for criticism of this kind.
  • October 10, 1924: Two Indians, Sam Smith and Big Lake Jim, have discovered gold at the north end of Little Atlin Lake. From the meagre details received the situation appears very promising. The Indians had been down about six fee but not to bed rock. The ground is shallow. Most of the men from Carcross are on their way in to stake.
  • October 10, 1924: The Great Northern Film Company have recently secured contracts for six additional Northern pictures, making in all eleven pictures instead of five as mentioned in our last issue. The value of the publicity to this country in the release of these pictures cannot be estimated. George E. Lewis, President of the company, with well known artists, have been in the north all summer and are at Carcross again this week in connection with the filming of "The Eternal Frontier."
  • October 10, 1924: The radio fans in Whitehorse are increasing. The latest addition is E. H. Johnson, who installed a set this week. Whitehorse has now four radio sets: Judge Bell, Lyle Geary, E. H. Johnson, and the set of Capt. Moorhead, which is still here. With these sets in operation the town should be kept well informed upon the happenings outside during the winter months.
  • October 17, 1924: A very large herd of caribou that has been working its way south for some time is now within twenty miles of town. Several of our townspeople have been going out in cars to see them.
  • October 17, 1924: Cam Smith likes thrills and is usually looking for them, but not the kind he got on Saturday night last. With Capt. Coghlan he had taken the mail down the river on the launch Loon. Coming back the Steamer Dawson had the Loon in tow. Rough water was encountered crossing Lake Laberge, and near midnight to Loon broke loose with Cam on board. A life boat was lowered and Cam, now well coated with ice and seated atop the launch, was rescued. The Loon will require some repairs.
  • October 17, 1924: The closing of river navigation brought so many people to town that the hotels had a task to provide sleeping accommodation. The Regina and Commercial were taxed to capacity but arrangements were quickly made to take care of the overflow in private homes.
  • October 24, 1924: Whitehorse has been forging right to the front this year. In practically all lines business is showing a decided increase. The town has taken on smarter appearance and this is only the beginning for the finishing touches will go on next year. More improvements have been made to buildings this year than for several years past. The school enrollment is the largest in years. The spirit of optimism among the people of the town was never so much in evidence. And rumor has it that the town, already lively, is to be livelier still by the organization of a town band. The instruments are here; several old players are here, and the boys say that J.P. Whitney is the one man who can put the thing over.
  • October 31, 1924: J. E. Geary, J. R. Alguire and Lyle Geary went down the river in a boat last week to get some caribou but they did not even see any. They returned home on the Thistle.
  • October 31, 1924: The editor of The Star expects to be leaving for Vancouver about the middle of December. The paper will appear every week but the issues for December 19th and 26th will be in print not later than December 12th.
  • October 31, 1924: In spite of the fact that the copper mines have been closed for some time business conditions in Whitehorse have remained remarkably good. Business men here as elsewhere are awakening to the value of the tourist trade and a more united effort is being made to cultivate it. Properly handled the town has a bright future even if the copper mines were never operated again.
  • October 31, 1924: There was a good attendance at the fire meeting on Wednesday evening. The report of the chief showed that the town had but three fires in the last two years, and that the fire fighting equipment was in splendid condition. George Ryder was the unanimous choice of the meeting for the position of fire chief for the next two years.

1925

January

  • January 30, 1925: Atlin has its first radio. It is installed by Will Roxborough in the Kootenay Hotel.

February

  • February 6, 1925: first edition with the title "The Whitehorse Star".

    The Whitehorse Star, February 6, 1925

  • February 6, 1925: After a year of uncertainty, it is announced that the Old Log Church will not be torn down. Bishop Bompas frequently preached at the church and Robert Service was a member and official of the church.

March

  • March 27, 1925: Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Williams take over the management of the Commercial Hotel.

July

  • July 17, 1925: "The midnight trips to Llewellyn Glacier being conducted by Paul Eggert, of Atlin, with the Launch 'Atlinto,' are proving very popular with the tourists. Two or three trips are made each week, and the marvellous colorings seen from the Glacier at sunrise are beyond description."

August

  • August 7, 1925: The Knight Templars of Pittsburg, the largest uniformed Commandery in the world, visit Whitehorse August 5.
  • August 28, 1925: In a plebiscite on August 24, Southern Yukon communities vote in favour of abolishing liquor and bars and saloons with liquor licenses.

October

  • October 30, 1925: George Black wins the election for the Yukon M.P. , defeating Robert Lowe.
  • October 30, 1925: On October 27, W.L. Phelps is elected to the Yukon Council by acclamation, suceeding Robert Lowe.

December

  • December 18, 1925 Percy Reid, former Chief Controller of Chinese Immigration and Division Commissioner of the Pacific Coast, is appointed gold commissioner on December 12.

1926

January

May

  • May 28, 1926 When the steamer Casca arrives in Whitehorse May 27 with a barge load of gasoline tanks, a record is made for the early landing of freight from down the river points. The earliest date in previous had been June 1st.

September

  • September 17, 1926: George Black wins the election for Yukon M.P., defeating Liberal Frederick Congdon. A petition is filed in Dawson on November 25, protesting the election of George Black. No reasons are given.
  • September 24, 1926 Work on the Whitehorse Copper properties is to be resumed under the management of the Richmond Consolidated Mining Company, as the result of satisfying diamon drilling operations.

October

  • October 15, 1926: On October 13, the steamer Dawson runs on the rocks at Rink Rapids and sinks.

1927

January

February

  • February 26, 1927: Captain Randolph Innes-Taylor, father of Alan Innes-Taylor and former publisher of a sports paper in Toronto, died in New Orleans on February 23.

May

  • May 6, 1927: Representative of the Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer Picture Corporation visit Whitehorse for the filming of a movie about the Trail of '98.
  • May 18, 1927: The Yukon Airways and Exploration Company Ltd. is incorporated as a private company. The company is based at Whitehorse and serves all parts of the Yukon. J.F. Finnegan is president, Clyde G. Wann vice-president, A.D. Cruikshank general manager, and C.A.K. Innes-Taylor advisory director. The company introduces commercial flying into the Yukon. In October 1927, the first plane, the Queen of the Yukon, is brought in.
  • May 27, 1927: Arrangements are made for the introduction of General Motors' lines into the Yukon. Taylor and Drury Ltd. will be the representatives for Southern Yukon and the Mayo-Keno district.
  • May 27, 1927: The first boat of the season to leave Whitehorse is the steamer Casca on May 23.

July

  • July 27, 1927: Diamond drilling discloses new rich ore bodies at the Pueblo mine.

August

  • August 5, 1927: The exemption from the payment of royalty on the content of silver-lead ores shipped from the Yukon Territory is extended for one year.

November

  • November 11, 1927: Bishop Stringer visits Whitehorse and gives a report about his missionary work in the Arctic, in particular on Herschel Island.
  • November 18, 1927: Percy Reid, Yukon gold commissioner, dies in Toronto November 14.

1928

January

February

  • February 17, 1928 A group of American financiers are working out a scheme to link the United States and Alaska by rail as steel is laid from Chicago to the Peace River district. The plan is to cover the construction of a line from the Peace River district to Alaska. The proposed line would link Dawson and Whitehorse in Canada, and Juneau and other points in Alaska directly with the rest of Canada and the United States.

March

  • March 30, 1928: Work on the Whitehorse Inn begins.

April

  • April 6, 1928 George I. Maclean is appointed Gold Commissioner for the Yukon on April 3.
  • April 13, 1928: Carcross and Atlin have the first visit from an airplane as on April 2, the Queen of the Yukon flies in. A month later, the Queen of the Yukon is badly damaged in bad weather.

June

  • June 1, 1928: On May 28 the steamer Aksala takes the largest single barge load of ore ever taken from Whitehorse. On the barge are 481 tons and on the boat 170 tons.
  • June 8, 1928: The Richmond-Yukon Copper Ltd. discontinues drilling operations on their Whitehorse copper properties as the ore bodies are not large enough.

July

  • July 20, 1928 Dr. Culbertson dies on July 12.

August

  • August 10, 1928: Fred McLennan, former store owner in Whitehorse, dies in Vancouver.
  • August 24, 1928: Bobby Kane discovers the largest nugget yet taken from Squaw Creek. The nugget has a value of $134.

September

  • September 7, 1928: Thomas Fuller died on September 6.
  • September 14, 1928: Wernecke's Fairchild first plane takes off from Carcross for Mayo.
  • September 28, 1928: Greenfield & Pickering get the permission of the Post Office Department to carry the mail by plane during the winter season. The Treadwell-Yukon Fairchild monoplane and the Moth are used for the service.

October

  • October 12, 1928: Clyde Wann's mother dies at Camas, Washington.

November

  • November 2, 1928: After being closed down for years work resumes on the Venus Extension mining property at Windy Arm.
  • November 2, 1928: C.A.K. Innes-Taylor gets married in Victoria on October 19.

December

  • December 14, 1928: The third plane, the Northern Light, is in service in the Yukon.

1929

January

  • January 9, 1929: Tex Rickard dies at Miami Beach on January 6 from an infection following an operation for appendicitis.

February

  • February 15, 1929: Fundraising starts for the necessary enlargement and improvement of the Whitehorse aviation field.

March

  • March 8, 1929 Charles Stewart, Minister of the Interior, announces that ample land, including the present aviation field, is set aside for aviation purposes.
  • March 29, 1929: The first cow in the history of Whitehorse is kept within the city limits.

April

  • April 5, 1929: A fire destroys the Liquor Store and adjacent buildings.
  • April 19, 1929: Clifford Sifton, for years an outstanding figure in Canadian political and business life, died at Roosevelt hospital in New York on April 17. He came here from his winter home in Florida to consult a heart specialist.


Continue to January 1930