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The Whitehorse Star, January 21, 1910


Highlights of History from The Whitehorse Star, 1910-1919


Highlights of History from The Whitehorse Star

Explorer's Guides to Yukon Communities



1910

January

  • January 7, 1910: Battling for nearly a month, and so reduced in resource that he had to live for days on his moccasins and muck lucks and the fibre of his snow shoes is the remarkuble experience of Bishop I. O. Stringer of the Charch of England, who arrived here from Fort MacPherson yesterday. With him during the trying trip and suffering the same privation was Charles F. Johnson, a missionary of the Mackenzie valley.
  • January 7, 1910: Richard Crawford is in St. Mary's hospital suffering from a bad attack of typhoid fever. He took his drinking water from the Yukon River at a location where the water is known to be impure. Dr. Thompson warns people to go well out into the stream there to get pure water.
  • January 7, 1910: While somewhat intoxicated, Miss Osie Hopkins, member of the Skagway demi-moude, drank the contents of a small bottle of carbolic acid last Saturday night. Only prompt medical attention saved her life.

  • January 14, 1910: "Swiftwater Bill" turns up in the Andes mountains in Peru where he is examining a placer mine.
  • January 14, 1910: Haines, Alaska is incorporated after a favourable plebiscite.
  • January 14, 1910: George Black and Frank McDougal of Dawson are admitted to the bar in Vancouver, B.C. on December 16. They both plan to return to Dawson.
  • January 14, 1910: John C. Ross, old time Dawson man, has been throwing money away in Victoria, by the thousands of dollars daily, and is now being held for insanity.

  • January 21, 1910: From present indications, there will be renewed activity in quartz mining in the Wheaton District, and more particularly on the Porter group of claims or what is generally known as Carbon Hill.
  • January 21, 1910: Lost for sixteen days in the Koyukuk valley, with the temperature 54 to 60 degrees below zero, without food, matches, ax or knife, Vernon Brewster, an old-time prospector and miner, was forced to kill three of his dogs to eat in order to escape destruction in the frozen wilderness.
  • January 21, 1910: Mrs B. A. Rockefeller of San Francisco died in Fairbanks today as the result of exposure while coming in from Valdez on the stage. The bodies of Joe King and Frank Giebel, lost on the Valdez trail in the recent blizzard, were found today, frozen stiff. Signal corps men are searching for others who are missing.

  • January 28, 1910: English and American capitalists are at present perfecting plans to build a railway from Winnipeg to the Yukon.
  • January 28, 1910: W. S. (Fred) Whitman, who since 1905 has been foreman of various mines in the Conrad district and is also well known in Whitehorse, is going to the head of Portland canal to look over some gold quartz properties.
  • January 28, 1910: There are a great many placer miners, prospectors and others who are planning on going to the newly discovered Iditarod country early in the spring, and for those who contemplate such a trip, the carefully prepared information we are giving below will prove beneficial in many ways.
  • January 28, 1910: In Victoria on January 7th, for the first time in the history of Canada, Chief Justice Hunter granted an order in application for leave to presume death in the case of Angus McKinnon, timber cruiser, who disappeared in the Skeena river country two years ago.

February

  • February 4, 1910: At a well-attended meeting last Saturday, Eli Hume was elected Fire Chief. He received 52 votes, while the other candidate, Denny O'Connor, received 25.
  • February 4, 1910: The greatest battle between a man and the ferocious beasts which inhabit the wilds of interior Yukon, took place on the headwaters of Stewart river October 26th last. James M. Christie, a passenger arriving on Tuesday's stage, survived to relate his thrilling experience with a bear.
  • February 4, 1910: Just to let the people of Whitehorse koow that he has not gone out of business, the dog poisoner added two more victims to his already long list. Teddy, the fox terrier belonging to Mrs R. Kelsey, and an unknown dog were handed the knockout drops this time.

  • February 11, 1910: Thomas Kendrick, an old section man employed at the summit of the White Pass, met his death last Saturday morning by being run down by the rotary snow plow when he was unable to climb out from the high snow banks lining the track. Read the entire article here.
  • February 11, 1910: Sometime during last Saturday night or Sunday a big slide occurred on the line of the White Pass at a point on Lake Bennett about three miles north of Bennett station. Thousands of tons of snow, ice and rock crashed down the steep mountain side and slid half way across the lake on the ice. For a distance of one thousand feet the railroad track is buried beneath several feet of rock and ice.
  • February 11, 1910: The dog poisoner came very near adding to his list a human life. On Tuesday myhta dog belonging to some Indians picked up a piece of poisoned meat and carried it to the Indian camp north of town. The dog after devouring the meat commenced frothing at the mouth, and an Indian baby playing around the floor of the shack into which the dog had made its way in some manner got some of the saliva from the dog's mouth on its hands and in turn was also poisoned. The child was taken to the Police Barracks and through the efforts of Dr. Pare its life was saved.

  • February 18, 1910: C. E. Burch the ice automobile inventer who is now at Carcross is busy getting his crate together and expects to make some fast runs on the lake and through the country in the near future. This is Mr. Burch's third winter at Carcross on the same enterprise, and during the past year be has made numerous alterations and improvements in his machine.
  • February 18, 1910: Forty two head of horses arrived on Saturday's train for the stage service at the White Pass & Yukon Route and will be distributed to the different posts along the line between here and Dawson. These horses were purchased in Alberta by Dr. Coots. Heretofore the W. P. & Y. R. has always bought its horses in Oregon and Washington, and this shipment of forty two head is the first to come from the Northwest Territories. On the next trip of the SS Jefferson twenty head more will arrive.
  • February 18, 1910: The work of installing the new steam power plant at the Venus mine is progressing rapidly and satisfactorily. The plant when completed will be utilized for compressing air to run the machines at the Venus mine in the winter time, or at such times when there is not sufficient water power available to perform this work.

  • February 25, 1910: The Ice Carnival held in Whitehorse on February 18th was a big success.
  • February 25, 1910: Harry Waugh the well known Klondike miner and his partner Oscar Nuhn arrived in Whitehorse on last Thursday's stage and left for the outside Saturday morning. They have just completed a long overland trip, having come from the MacKenzie river country in the vicinity of Herschel Island, Fort McPherson and the head of the Porcupine river.
  • February 25, 1910: H. W. Vance, general manager of the Conrad Mines, was a visitor in town last Friday and Saturday. Mr. Vance stated that the force of men at the Big Thing mine would be increased just as soon as the weather conditions permitted, and that the probabilities are that the Big Thing mine within the next few months would be shipping considerable ore. Two teams are now hauling ore to Carcross.

March

  • March 4, 1910: Word comes from Ottawa that J. T. Lithgow, Comptroller at Dawson, will in all probability not return to the Yukon. The Government has proffered Mr. Lithgow a splendid position, that of organizing the accounting system for the proposed navy.
  • March 4, 1910: Dr. R. B. Coutts, veterinary for the White Pass company, accompanied by Mrs. Coutts, arrived on Saturday's train. Dr Coutts brought north a shipment of eighteen head of horses purchased for the company in Eastern Washington to be used on the stage line between here and Dawson. After spending a few days in Whitehorse Dr. and Mrs. Coutts will proceed to their home at Dawson.
  • March 4, 1910: Robert Jones was suddenly aroused from his morning sleep on Monday to find his cabin on fire. The flames had already caught his bedclothes, and the knob of the door was so hot that when he grasped it he burned his hand severely. The cabin and contents were consumed in a few minutes.

  • March 11, 1910: On March 3, an explosion at the 1,100-foot level of the Mexican mine on Douglas Island killed 39 miners and injured about a dozen others, some severely. Read the entire article here.
  • March 11, 1910: A report from Circle City, Alaska, dated Feb. 26, states that Frank White, formerly of Dawson, shot and killed Mrs. Stade and then shot himself. Both died instantly. Mrs. Stade was the wife of H. A. Stade, proprietor of the Jump Off roadhouse, 22 miles from Circle. Stade and his wife separated last fall, when she came to Circle and bought a laundry. White frequently called on the woman, but the cause of the murder is unknown. White is said to have been sober at the time he committed the rash act.
  • March 11, 1910: Several teams were busy Tuesday and Wednesday of this week moving a cottage purchased by Mr. H G. Macpherson to the lot just west of the Shadwell residence. When completed it will make cosy little home for someone.

  • March 18, 1910: The warm winds since Sunday has rapidly melted the snow. The streets around town and the roads leading out of town are one mass of slush and great pools of water here and there, as the ground has not thawed sufficiently to allow the water to seep through. In a great many places on this end of the Dawson trail there is absolutely no snow and if the present warm spell continues it will be a question of but a few days until the entire trail will be rendered impassible for sleighs and wheels will take the place of runners.
  • March 18, 1910: Effective Tuesday March 15th the passenger fare via stage from Whitehorse to Dawson was advanced from $80.00 to $100.00.
  • March 18, 1910: Work has been resumed on the Government wagon bridge at Carcross. This bridge when completed will prove a valuable asset to the town.

  • March 25, 1910: The White Pass & Yukon railroad will complete the spur track to the Pueblo mine by building four miles of new road this summer at a cost of not less than $200,000. The work on the new track will begin on April 1st when a steam whovel, two work trains, about twenty teams of horses and over a hundred men will commence its construction. The number of men will be doubled a little later in the season.
  • March 25, 1910: The blowing of the whistle on Monday morning announced to the people of Whitehorse that another season's activity at the B. Y. N. shipyards had begun. Fifty three men are now employed in fitting and preparing the steamers and barges for their summer's work.
  • March 25, 1910: Tom Lloyd and his party reached a point 12,000 feet up the side of Mt. McKinley and established a camp there on February 18. Conditions are so favourable they intend to make a dash for the summit, and hope to reach the "top of the continent" by about March 20.

April

  • April 1, 1910: After preparatory work, active building operations on the White Pass & Yukon Route railroad spur into the Whitehorse copper belt began today. About 30 labourers from Skagway got off the train at Ear Lake and took two W. P. & Y. sleighs to the new Grafter Camp near the Grafter Mine.
  • April 1, 1910: Chas. Pugsley left yesterday morning to commence work on the Valerie mine for M. Palmer. He will have several men in his employ. The Valerie is one of the most promising mines of the copper belt. It lies near the spur, a good deal of money has been spent on the development work, and a considerable quantity of ore is blocked out for shipment.
  • April 1, 1910: Colonel John Howard Conrad was married to Miss Nellie Elizabeth Robertson at Muscatine, Iowa on the 15th of March.

  • April 8, 1910: A. Gusfield has built an ice boat for the double purpose of giving his friends a spin through space at a breath-taking-away velocity, and to prove to all those who are from Missouri on the question that an ice boat will outstrip the wind in its tremendous speed.
  • April 8, 1910: The installation of a quartz mill on the Lone Star group late last summer marked an epoch in the Klondike - the passing from placer to quartz that has taken place in other rich mining camps. Generally it follows the exhaustion of the placer gold, but the Klondike auriferous gravels will not be exhausted in another twenty years, with all the dredges and great hydraulic works that can be employed.
  • April 8, 1910: Mr J. Stewart has been engaged in moving a building from Bennett to Carcross, where he proposes to start in the storekeeping business.

  • April 15, 1910: Work on the mammoth power undertaking backed by A. N. C. Treadgold is well under way for the season. The first work is to be near the mouth of the North Fork of the Klondike river, which is to be tapped with a ditch six to eight miles long. The water is to be conveyed along an old channel, and given a long fall into the main Klondike. The power will be used to pump water to placer hills on various creeks, to include Hunker, Last Chance and others.
  • April 15, 1910: Unquestionably the biggest mining investment made by Spokane people for years is the purchase of the entire holdings of the Yukon-Pueblo Mining company at Whitehorse, for $500,000 cash, by the Atlas Mining company, a close corporation organized under the laws of West Virginia for that purpose. As the vendors of the property are Byron N. White and his associates, the bulk of the purchase money will remain in Spokane.
  • April 15, 1910: Sergeant Joy and Constable McVicker of the N.W.M.P. left for New Westminster, having in custody Sam Volovich, the Slav, who stabbed a woman of the underworld at Dawson about four months ago, and who has been sentenced to serve eleven years in the penitentiary for his dastardly crime.

  • April 22, 1910: That Whitehorse has lived almost wholly on Faith for the past several years is well known to all and especially has it been painfully apparent to the people of Whitehorse themselves. But that the faith that was in them was justified is now being proven by current events. For years the vast mineral wealth of this community has lain as Nature left it - in undisturbed repose. But now it is to be mined and to that end steps are now being rapidly taken.
  • April 22, 1910: The year 1909 will be marked in the calendar as a red letter year in the history of the crusade against consumption. Never since the organization of the Canadian Association for the Prevention of Tuberculosis has there been such activity displayed in Canada in this fight for life.
  • April 22, 1910: Mrs. O'Connor was assaulted at her home last Saturday morning by Mrs. Salvatore in a rather vicious manner. The same day the latter was hauled before Magistrate Taylor on the charge of assault with the intent to do bodily harm. She was given the alternative of paying a fine of $100 or going to jail for six months. As the woman is the mother of four little children, it was not thought right by the citizens of the town that she should be incarcerated and the result was that, as she had no money, a public subscription was taken up and the fine paid.

  • April 29, 1910: While Supt. Hahn is sparing nothing which will serve to hasten the completion of the railroad spur to the Pueblo mine, the continued cold weather is very materially holding back the work as in many places it is still necessary to shovel snow from the right of way before the ground can thaw sufficiently to permit of the work of grading being carried on. But little rock work remains to be done, all the heavy excavations being on that portion of the road which was constructed two years ago. Something over 100 men are now employed and all comers will be taken on as soon as the frost is out of the ground. A large number of ore cars for use on mine sidings were received early this week. Indications are that the road will be completed to the Pueblo mine early in July.
  • April 29, 1910: Jack M. Stewart of Carcross last week moved from Bennett the Vendome hotel which, in the palmy days of the latter town, was its best lodging hostelery, to Carcross via Lake Bennett, a distance of 30 miles. The building was loaded on bobs, one under each corner, and six horses "yanked" it down the ice the same as though it had been a sleighing party. Mr. Stewart will use the building for a store at Carcross.
  • April 29, 1910: James Richards (Buzzsaw Jimmy), with that spirit of enterprise which has ever characterized him, has secured a new sawmill and has the same ready for operation oo the vacant lot in the rear of Lowe's blacksmith shop.

May

  • May 6, 1910: On Wednesday Dan Gillis made a trip in his gasoline boat down the river in quest of ducks until he reached the Big Bend five miles below town where he found a mighty ice jam. It is said to have broken since and by the first of the week it is believed the head of Lake Lebarge can be reached in small boats. While considerable open water is reported between here and Dawson, the ice is still solid at many places but it is believed it will break all along within very few hours, three days at the outside.
  • May 6, 1910: Samuel May who for several years past has been working his claim, 98 on Burwash creek, arrived in town Tuesday. He reports spring as being very backward in that country this year and when he left Burwash not a drop of water had started in any of the creeks of that district. He says the Jacquots are taking out a big dump and will be in line for a good cleanup as soon as water begins to run. Henry Arp and associates on Burwash also have out a goodsized dump and will keep adding to it until there is water sufficient for sluicing. Mr. May and B. J. MeGee are partners in several claims on Burwash.
  • May 6, 1910: E. H. Thurston, principal stockholder and manager of the Northern Light and Power Company, has 2125 tons here and at Skagway for a mammoth power plant at Coal Creek. The machinery is for a ten thousand horsepower generator, the biggest thing of the kind ever shipped to the northland. The light and power plant now located at Dawson will be moved to Coal Creek, the new owners being of the opinion that they can transmit light and power cheaper than they can transport coal from their mines to Dawson.
  • May 6, 1910: A very sad occurence took place on the Cottage City last Friday evening when little Carolyn Cochran died after an illness of less than one day. Read that article and much more about the family here.

  • May 13, 1910: Last Friday night, May 6th at shortly after 9 o'clock, London time (2:18 p. m., local time) Edward the VII, King of Great Britain, passed to his reward at the royal palace, London. The immediate cause of his death was heart trouble caused by an attack of pneumonia which produced choking. His condition was not considered alarming until a few hours before his death. His oldest living son, George, Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall and York, took the oath of office on Saturday, the 7th, and is now King of Great Britain.
  • May 13, 1910: The American Boundary Survey party, 88 men and 25 horses, arrived here on Saturday's train, the party being under the guidance of Thos. Riggs, Jr., of Washington, D. C. From Champagne Landing the party will secure 50 additional horses which have been wintered at that place by "Shorty" Chambers. Mr. Craig, in charge of the Canadian Boundary Survey, arrived on Tuesday's train with a number of men, other men with 35 horses having come on ahead of him.
  • May 13, 1910: John Mocine, manager of the Atlas Mining Company, arrived from Spokane Tuesday accompanied by 11 mechanics who are now at work putting up buildings at the Pueblo mine preparatory to inaugurating the actual work of mining in about two weeks by which time a number of hardrock miners will have been engaged.

  • May 20, 1910: Although freighting over Lake Lebarge was carried on for several days after it became what the teamsters considered highly dangerous, there was several tons of freight left at the head of the lake when work in that line was suspended. It will be picked up and carried to its destination when the lake opens. The steamer Casca got away from Hootalinqua last Saturday at 1 o'clock in the afternoon.
  • May 20, 1910: Six placer mining claims have been recorded here, which are located on the right limit of the right fork of the Nestling river which is a tributary of the Donjek which, in turn, empties into the White. The location of the new find is about 50 miles west of Tantalus which is on the Yukon river about half way between Whitehorse and Dawson, being about 25 miles this side of Yukon Crossing.
  • May 20, 1910: The working force on the railroad spur, while of a very migratory class, is being fairly well kept up and the work is progressing satisfactorily. While many of the laborers have quit lately to go down the river, newcomers arrive almost daily and the positions are kept well filled. No better weather for railroad construction could be desired than that of the present time.

  • May 27, 1910: The committee in charge of the mosquito question have been enabled to raise money enough to purchase a good supply of heavy crude oil which will be properly distributed over the surface of all the stagnant ponds within a radius of a mile of Whitehorse and it is believed that this will keep down the annual heavy crop of mosquitoes.
  • May 27, 1910: Richard Lewis and E. J. Edwards have purchased the Commercial Cafe business from Greig Neilson and are continuing at the old stand. Mr. Lewis is an experienced buyer and caterer and Mr. Edwards is reputed to be one of the very best cooks in the territory, having been employed in that capacity at the barracks for a long time.
  • May 27, 1910: Several members of the local police force have decided to become private citizens and are buying their discharges. Constable Stewart severed his connection two weeks ago and Constables Garlick, Blackburn and Palfrey will follow suit in the next few days.

June

  • June 3, 1910: Henry Phillips, for a long time employed in the Star office but for the past two years totempole editor of the Skagway Alaskan, was among the distinguished guests of Whitehorse Saturday, with his new bride. Henry is the only native printer in the north and what he knows about the business would fill a World's almanac.
  • June 3, 1910: At present there are not to exceed 50 people here awaiting the opening of navigation but there are several hundred at Skagway and all the steamers due from below for the next three or four weeks are fully sold and it is expected that several thousand people will pass through here enroute down river within the next few weeks.
  • June 3, 1910: Charles Watson who has resided in Southern Yukon for the past ten years, nearly the past five of which were spent at Conrad where owned and conducted the Windy Arm hotel, locked up that hostelery last Friday, came to Whitehorse and attended the celebration and left that evening for Skagway where he took the steamer for Prince Rupert where he will stop a few days before joining his family in Vancouver.

  • June 10, 1910: Even as a Phoenix rising from the ashes, so the little town of Carcross assumes once more an urban appearance. The new depot of the White Pass Company has been placed somewhat nearer to the wharf and freight sheds, and is consequently in closer proximity to the landing stage of the lake steamer, the Gleaner. Read the entire article here.
  • June 10, 1910: J. R. Alguire has closed his store in Whitehorse and moved his stock of tobacco, cigars, fruit, candy and confectionery to the Pueblo mine where he has reopened business and will cater to the trade of that locality,
  • June 10, 1910: Iditarod-Bound Pilgrims Hold Fast to Their Dough. Never in the history of Whitehorse has such a well-behaved bunch of people passed through here for the interior, as is going in this spring. With the exception of a few who quit work on the spur some weeks ago and celebrated before leaving for down river in small boats, there has not been a drunken stranger seen in town for a month.

  • June 17, 1910: Navigation for the season of 1910 is fully open and all the river and lake boats of the Yukon are now in active commission. The first boat, the White Horse, got away Wednesday of last week with 220 passengers. The Dawson followed Friday with 180 and the Selkirk 24 hours later with an equal number.
  • June 17, 1910: A party of nine strangers bound for the Iditarod sailed down from Bennett the latter part of last week, reaching the head of the canyon Sunday morning. Six of them walked around the raging waters and the remaining three came through the canyon and rapids in the boat, making the trip, despite the very low water, without mishap.
  • June 17, 1910: Geological Surveyor D. D. Cairnes arrived from Ottawa Tuesday evening and left Wednesday for the Atlin country where he will be engaged in geological work during the season. In former years Mr. Cairnes has had but two professional assistants but this season he has four and the result will be that more will be accomplished this year than ever before. With flagmen and cooks, he will have eight or ten men in his party.

  • June 24, 1910: The Casca bumped into a rock and sank in seven feet of water in the Thirty-mile river on June 22. Foreman Al. Henderson has had a crew of six men at work, and on Wednesday they succeeded in raising her stern out of the water.
  • June 24, 1910: Robby, the eldest son of John Ryan, became ill on Tuesday and Dr. Clark diagnosed the cause of the illness as being scarlet fever. The boy is being carefully nursed by his aunt, Miss Kate Ryan, but the seriousness of the attack cannot be determined yet for several days. The school has been disinfected and was closed for a day.
  • June 24, 1910: Messrs. W. G. Blackwell and C. C. Brett, two promising appearing young men who arrived the latter part of last week from Ontario in response to a call issued by Bishop L O. Stringer of the Yukon diocese, Church of England, for young men to engage in mission work in the North, will be ordained in the ministry as deacons by Bishop Stringer at Christ Church at 11 o'clock Sunday morning.

July

  • July 1, 1910: The steamer Casca which struck a rock in the Thirtymile river when on the way to Dawson from this place on the morning of June 15th, was safely landed at this place early Wednesday morning and has since been hauled out on the ways at the shipyards. The Casca is very badly damaged and it is not yet known just what will be done toward repairing her. It is said that it will cost almost as much to repair the damage to her hull as it will to build a new one.
  • July 1, 1910: W. J. Graves has leased the Breese property in the north part of town and converted it into a skating pavilion and shooting gallery. He has just received 60 pairs of the latest in roller skates, and is out with a most generous offer to the public in that all who so desire can skate from 9 to 11 o'clock each forenoon free of charge by way of practice. The floor is in firstclass condition and good, vigorous and health-giving sport may be anticipated.
  • July 1, 1910: There was a big land and rock slide on the railroad between Bennett and Pennington sometime Tuesday night which delayed traffic until yesterday. The slide brought down from the mountainside earth and rocks which covered the track for a distance of about 80 feet and to a depth of from five to twenty feet. Forty laborers were taken from the spur to the scene of the slide Wednesday morning to assist in clearing the track, which required about 18 hours steady work.

  • July 8, 1910: A party of millionaires and their servants arrived at Skagway by chartered steamer, then continued on to Whitehorse by chartered train on Wednesday. Locals were deeply offended that they brought their own food, cooks and waiters, and the galley crew of the steamer White Horse threatened to walk off. The servants were left here and the steamer left for Dawson with its standard crew.
  • July 8, 1910: The excursion train to Skagway last Saturday, the occasion of that town's annual Fourth of July celebration, carried about 135 people. Except in supplying a fair part of the crowd, Whitehorse had but little hand in the celebration as she had no bowling teams and no baseball team.
  • July 8, 1910: Mrs. Percy Reid of Carcross and two little sons returned Saturday from California to which place they went several months ago for Mrs. Reid's health, She returned greatly improved.

  • July 15, 1910: Charles Ward, one of the pioneer prospectors of this place, sold his interest, which was one third, in the Anaconda quartz claim Friday of last week to E. A. Dixon, one of the other owners of the property, for $4000 cash.
  • July 15, 1910: At the recent session of the Yukon council an appropriation of $1000 was made for the purpose of building an addition to the General hospital of this place, the annex to be 18 by 24 and to used as an office and labratory. The hospital board has given a contract for the work to Eli Hume and he would have already been started on the structure were it not for the typhoid patient, Henry Meyers, in the hospital.
  • July 15, 1910: The Atlas Mining people moved into their new home at the Pueblo Wednesday of this week and they now occupy what is probably the finest miners quarters in the Dominion. The building has accomodations for 66 men and is provided with all modern conveniences. A music machine which cost $350 was taken out from town Wednesday.

  • July 22, 1910: On Monday, train Engineer "Billy" Williams and Fireman "Bob" Foster, were injured when their locomotive, the tender and three gravel cars jumped the tracks on the spur. The men are in the hospital, Mr. Williams with a broken hip and Mr. Foster badly bruised shoulder and hip.
  • July 22, 1910: The largest gold-saving dredge in the world is now being shipped into the Yukon from Marion, Ohio, where it was manufactured, by Joseph W. Boyle, owner of what is probably the richest dredging concession on the face of the earth, one dredge being already in operation on the property and yielding phenominally rich returns.
  • July 22, 1910: Last Sunday, Charley Johnston of the Regina, and E. G. Morley of the bank, cut down a tree with an eagle's nest and captured the only occupant of the nest, a fine young eagle of either the Bald or Golden variety. The bird closed on the hand of "Chawles" and that member is now worn in a sling. The eagle is on exhibition at the Regina. The owners are thinking of securing a tent and going on the road.

  • July 29, 1910: Never before in the history of this portion of the country has such havoc been worked by the elements as that wrought by the recent heavy rains- veritable cloudbursts in many places. Dry gulches and ravines became raging torrents which swept road grades before them and left desolation in their wakes. Damage will amount to not less than $25,000.
  • July 29, 1910: Theodore Sweet who is employed on the Big Thing mine in the Conrad district, one of the properties which is principaliy owned by Colonel John H. Conrad, was in town a couple of days lately and stated that ore taken from the seven hundred foot level of the Big Thing mine assays as high as $800 to the ton. General Manager Vance is working a crew of 15 men on the Big Thing and the proverty is developing into what is probably the greatest silver and gold mine in the North.
  • July 29, 1910: After being on the ways for four weeks, during which time she was practically rebuilt, the steamer Casca was launched at the shipyards Sunday evening and dispatched Monday night for down river points. The Casca replaces the Bonanza King which was badly damaged on her last trip down the river by coming in contact with one of the rocks in Five Fingers.

August

  • August 5, 1910: Captain Tom Smith, owner and master of the launch Frontiersman, arrived from Teslin Monday and left again for that place Wednesday evening, taking a cargo of merchandise for a trading post which he is opening at that place.
  • August 5, 1910: R. K. Neill of Spokane, Wash., president of the Atlas Mining company which lately invested upward of $500,000 in the Pueblo mine which is located near this place, arrived here Thursday evening of last week and was met at the depot by W. D. Greenough, general manager for the company, himself being a heavy stockholder. Mr. Neill was greatly disappointed on reaching here to be informed that the Canadian government is charging 2½% per cent royalty on the gross output of copper. He says that royalty makes mining prohibitive.
  • August 5, 1910: The families of Judge Taylor and T. L. McRae spent several days lately at Ear Lake where a tent town is springing up. Sunday was visitors day at the lake and upward of 30 people were there. Owing to the recent heavy rains the lake is fully ten feet higher than ever before known.

  • August 12, 1910: The annual union Sunday school excursion and picnic was held Tuesday when everybody who could get away joined the throng and spent the day on classic Lake Lebarge. The flag ship White Horse was secured for the outing and at 10 o'clock it pulled out for down river with upward of 150 people on board.
  • August 12, 1910: Fred Pare, one of the best known and most popular young men of Whitehorse, died in Montreal Monday morning after a manly struggle with that dread disease, tuberculosis. For several years he had been employed by the White Pass Railway Company, first as express messenger and baggageman, and later as telegraph operator.
  • August 12, 1910: A party of young ladies and gentlemen chaperoned by Mrs. H. E. Porter went to the mouth of the Tahkini river last Saturday afternoon in the B. Y. N. launch Pelican. A picnic supper was enjoyed on the river bank and the party returned home at 10:30 at night.

  • August 19, 1910: The White Pass has decided to build a new passenger steamer to operate between this place and Dawson. While the new craft will be 169 feet in length, six feet shorter than the White Horse, present flagship of the fleet, it will be four feet wider than the last mentioned boat, which extra width will enable her to have a full third deck of staterooms, giving her about one third more carrying capacity than the White Horse. The Star is offering a cash prize of $25 to the person proposing the most suitable name for the new steamer.
  • August 19, 1910: Never before in the history of the territory have so many hunters of big game been here in one season as at present, no less than five parties having arrived here, outfitted and struck out into the "uncut" within the past few days.
  • August 19, 1910: News of a copper strike of phenomenal richness on the Peel river is brought by the officers of the steamer Pauline, which arrived this morning from Mayo. A. E. McKay, the discoverer, brought the news to Mayo, and told the story to Hill Barrington and others of the Pauline.

  • August 26, 1910: Beginning last Saturday when thirteen cars containing 245 tons of ore from the Pueblo mine were shipped to Skagway by the Atlas Mining company, daily shipments have since been made and will be continued indefinitely.
  • August 26, 1910: Colonel J. H. Conrad, managing owner of the various mining properties on Little Windy Arm, arrived from the outside about ten days ago, visited his hydraulic interests in the Porcupine and came on to Yukon the latter part of last week, visiting his Yukon home in Carcross and his property on Windy Arm.
  • August 26, 1910: Number 1, volume 1 of the Iditarod Pioneer has reached our exchange table. The new publication is owned and "perpetrated" by George M. Arbuckle who first became known to fame as the "Hired Man" of the Bennett News eleven years ago. The Pioneer is a healthy appearing, seven column, four page paper and is replete in news and live ads of the new camp.

September

  • September 2, 1910: Taylor & Drury is building a new steamer, named Kluahne. Although the Kluahne will do a general steamboat business in the way of carrying both freight and passengers, she was constructed by her owners primarily for their own use in carrying supplies to their outlying trading posts, one at Teslin, another at Little Salmon and still another 250 miles up from the Yukon on the Pelly river. The Kluahne is 55 feet long with a breadth of beam of 13 feet.
  • September 2, 1910: Skagway is to lose one of its pioneer institutions, the branch of the Canadian Bank of Commerce which has operated at that place for between 11 and 12 years and which has ever been popular and obliging. The remaining accounts of the bank will be transferred to the branch of the same institution at this place immediately after the date of its closing, September 30th.
  • September 2, 1910: Over one hundred cases of whooping cough are reported at Dawson. We know how to sympathize as we had ours last winter. The only consolation we can offer Dawson is that, barring backsets, those afflicted will recover - in about four months.

  • September 9, 1910: A shipment of cattle comprising 221 head arrived by Tuesday's train on the way to Fairbanks. This was the last cattle shipment of the season for lower Alaska but there are about 400 head to pass through here for Dawson within the next few days. The cattle which arrived Tuesday night were from Montana ranges and will be worth, when delivered in Fairbanks, from $500 to $600 per head.
  • September 9, 1910: W. O. Oppenhoff, president of the Tutshi Lake Mining company which is operated about five miles east of Bennett station, was here last Friday on his way to Bennett from Dawson where he has been for several years and where he is still interested in mining property. Several men have been at work on the company property near Bennett for the past several months and the showings made are such as warrant the purchase and installation of machinery at once. The ore carries both gold and silver.
  • September 9, 1910: Last Sunday, the six or seven year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Horsfall was killed at Selkirk. The child was playing with matches in the rear of the house when his clothes became ignited and before help could arrive he was so badly burned that death resulted within a few minutes.

  • September 16, 1910: Gold to the value of $75,000 mysteriously disappears while in transit from Fairbanks to Seattle - express and mail both robbed, $57,500 from former and $27,500 from latter. The express box was emptied of gold and filled with lead.
  • September 16, 1910: The Canadian Railroad Commission, which has been in session at Vancouver since Sept. 5, has ordered the White Pass and Yukon Route to lower its freight rate on ore, and to immediately file with the commission a new schedule of freight rates covering general commodities.
  • September 16, 1910: A group of copper claims in the Rainy Hollow country has just been bonded for $490,000, the money to be paid by the first of January. The property lies inland from Haines, Alaska, and is a big proposition.

  • September 23, 1910: William R. Hulbert, the aged gardener for the B. Y. N. company, was stricken with paralysis Tuesday evening about 5 o'clock and died that night at 11:30 without regaining consciousness. Read the entire article here.
  • September 23, 1910: Hallock C. Bundy, newspaper man and writer of San Francisco, arrived here from Dawson on the White Horse last Friday on his way out to Vancouver where he will open a publicity office on behalf of Yukon, the object being to advertise the territory with the view of inducing tourists to come here next summer and during succeeding years. Residents of Dawson raised $1500 to further his proposition, but residents of Whitehorse declined, as tourists are invariably rushed from train to steamer with no time here.
  • September 23, 1910: Foreman William Donnenworth and the men with him from this place returned Monday from Livingstone to which place they repaired and constructed considerable new road leading in frorn Mason's Landing. The miners of that district now have the best road they have ever had. About $5,000 in labor was expended on it by the government.

  • September 30, 1910: Through the representation of Bishop Stringer, the Dominion government devotes $30,000 to the erection of a territorial mission school for Indians at Carcross.
  • September 30, 1910: Owing to the fact that Skagway has no bank as of October 1, the White Pass & Yukon Route make arrangements to establish their own accommodation bank.
  • September 30, 1910: The first fatality of the season occurred on the river at about 2 o'clock last Saturday morning when Ernest Blythe, second mate of the steamer Selkirk, lost his life at a point in the Thirtymile about six miles above Hootalinqua. Read the entire article here.

October

  • October 21, 1910: The Lafrance is the last steamer of the season, leaving from Dawson October 20 and arriving in Whitehorse October 25.

November

  • November 18, 1910: The government wagon bridge across the Caribou arm at Carcross was completed on November 14th.
  • November 18, 1910: The Atlas Mining Company which early last spring purchased from Byron N. White of Spokane, the Pueblo mine located six miles from this place, which property has since been continuously worked, has suspended all operations, let all the men go, packed and stored everything movable about the mine, nailed up the buildings and left the property without even a watchman. Supt. Mocine left on yesterday's train for Skagway, enroute to his home and the company's headquarters at Spokane. No explanation has been given for the closure.
  • November 18, 1910: William Chantler, the well known local mechanic, has a force of men at work installing a sawmill near the Tenmile roadhouse on the Dawson trail. The mill is the one shipped into this country some years ago by the W. L. Breese outfit and has never been used. A year ago it was brought in from Bullion creek in the Kluane district where it was taken by Breese.

December

  • December 2, 1910: River at This Place is Closed For Season. After much pulsating, throbbing and other evidence of unrest, the bosom of old Yukon is at rest and will remain so for several months to come.
  • December 2, 1910: The masquerade skating carnival at the Club rink Friday night, the first of the season, was largely attended, no less than sixty skaters being in costume. The ice was in splendid condition and the weather was just right for skating but rather chilly for the members of the band, playing in the open in winter in Yukon being fraught with more difficulty than is apparent to the un-"toot"-ered.
  • December 2, 1910: H. E. Porter is ready to leave with an outfit to establish a trading post in the Ibex country but is detained by the poor condition of the trails, there being too much snow for wheels and not enough for runners. The Ibex is a great fur-producing country and Porter's intentions are to trade with Indians.

  • December 9, 1910: That large Winton 6 automobile that is to revolutionize travel "betwixt" this place and Dawson, left here last Sunday with a cargo of mail for the purpose of going through to Dawson for the first time. All went swimmingly until Little River was reached when something went wrong with the dasherdictus which is located just between the bubellicus and the dickerdasher, being abaft of the mollydunk and on the haw side of the tiddlewhacker. The mail was recovered Tuesday morning by a reliable stage and four.
  • December 9, 1910: The announcement in this paper that McRae & Lucier, haberdashers, clothiers and tailors, are to quit Whitehorse will come us a surprise to everybody. The senior partner has been in business here ever since the town had a place on the map and Mr. Lucier has been here five years, the present firm being in existence over three years.
  • December 9, 1910: Mr. and Mrs. John Scott left Carcrosss for the outside early the present year. On November 24th, Winifred, their three year old daughter, died at the hospital in Kamloops. She and her twin brother were taken ill from ptomaine poisoning from eating canned peas, and while her brother recovered she died trom the effects.

1911

January

  • January 6, 1911: Attorney R. L. Ashbaugh, dean of the Dawson bar and member of the Yukon council, for the Bonanza district, died on January 3rd.

  • January 13, 1911: The Princess Adelaide is the name of a new steamer lately received at Vancouver by the C. P. R. company for use in western waters. She will likely be placed on the Skagway run for a few trips each fall to catch those returning from the North. The Adelaide is said to be the finest and fastest steamer now on the coast.

  • January 20, 1911: An agreement is reached between Canada and the U.S. to create an international railroad commission to control the border railways.

March

  • March 10, 1911: The police patrol from Fort Macpherson is overdue. More than a month later, the bodies of these four members of the R.N.W.M.P. winter patrol on their way from Fort MacPherson to Dawson are found near the mouth of the Mackenzie river (April 21). The bodies were found by a relief party which left Dawson February 28 to seek for the missing patrol which at that time was six weeks overdue.

  • March 17, 1911: Captain Syd C. Barrington, who is manager of the Side Streams Navigation company, will operate two steamers this season, the Lafrance and a new and larger boat which he and a crew of of 23 men will construct at the foot of the lake, the York Barington, named for his little son. The new boat will have practically new boilers which were in the steamer Vidette when she was purchased last fall but her engines are brand new and of the latest model.

  • March 24, 1911: Harry "Snowslide" Esquigge, who obtained his cognomen from sliding down a mountain side in an avalanche of several thousand tons of snow and lived to relate the experience of the trip, and Alex. Fisher, who has been mining on Sheep Creek for the past several years, reached town Monday. Esquigge has been mining on Fourth of July for several years.
  • March 24, 1911: Mr. Robert W. Service, whose latest book "The Trail of Ninety-eight" has met with much favour, is taking a well-earned rest at his mother's ranch some sixty miles out of Edmonton, Alberta. It is his purpose to remain there for several months and, as he says, enjoy the simple life.

April

  • April 14, 1911: The city of Iditarod, Alaska, has been destroyed by fire.
  • April 21, 1911: The bodies of four members of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police which composed the winter patrol party which was to come to Dawson from Fort Macpherson, near the mouth of the Mackenzie river, have been found. On December 22, Inspector Fitzgerald, in charge of the party, Constables Carter, Taylor and Kinuey with an Indian guide left Fort Macpherson for Dawson, a distance of approximately 550 miles. They had three teams of five dogs each and expected to reach Dawson about the middle of January, having with them provisions sufficient to last from 28 to 25 days, the length of time it was supposed would be consumed in making the journey.

  • April 28, 1911: Arnold L. Berdoe, general manager of the White Pass & Yukon Route leaves the company after 5 years on the job. Soon after (May 12), vice president Dickeson is appointed the new general manager.

May

  • May 5, 1911: Frederick Sargent, aged 93 years, died at Kodiak, Alaska, on March 15. He is survived by a wife and seven children. Mr. Sargent was undoubtedly the oldest white man in Alaska at the time of his death. We have reproduced this and several other articles from this issue - see them here.

  • May 12, 1911: One of the biggest mining deals in the history of the Yukon is closed when Daniel Guggenheim takes over the entire holdings of the National Trust Company of Toronto in the Yukon Territory.

  • May 26, 1911: Two Seattle aviators, Fred Weisman and Charles L. Young, are anxious to come to Whitehorse and give a flying exhibition. Read the entire article here.
  • May 26, 1911: River Disasters Very Numerous. Steamer Lafrance, Owned By Captain Syd Barrington, Burned to Waters Edge After Striking Rock In Thirtymile River - Two Barges Wrecked Below Hootalinqua - Slight Accident to Steamer Pauline - Other Craft Reaches Dawson Safely - Ice On Lake Labarge Holds Solid.

June

  • June 2, 1911: Due to continued cold weather, the water in the river at Whitehorse is still 6 inches too low to allow for any steamers to leave. The White Horse, Dawson, and Selkirk will be the first to go.
  • June 2, 1911: Territorial Secretary David R. Macfarlane has hired foremen for road-building projects: Simon Feindel for the road leading from Carcross to the Big Thing Mine; William McAdam for the Robinson-Watson-Wheaton road; William Donnenwerth and "Web" Webster for the Whitehorse-Yukon Crossing road. They will hire their own men and start work next week.
  • June 2, 1911: A cabin about a mile south of Ear Lake was recently robbed of about $30 worth of clothes, bedding and eatables, the property of E. J. Hamacher who had a wood camp there last winter.

  • June 16, 1911: Civil engineer H. L. Robbins arrived at Haines on the Dolphin to set up an office for the Alaska Midland Railroad project. A great deal of development and construction work will soon be done.

  • June 30, 1911: There are 20 cases of smallpox at Dawson. Whitehorse has been unsuccessful in getting a quarantine established, and 25 refugees from Dawson were allowed to land on June 28th.

July

  • July 28, 1911: The minister of justice recommends to reduce the number of judges in the Yukon from 3 to 1.

August

  • August 4, 1911: Major A.E. Snyder, commander of the Yukon division of the R.N.W.M.P., leaves the north.

  • August 11, 1911: The new steamer Casca under construction at the B.Y.N. shipyards since fall 1910, is launched August 5. The Casca is entirely new from stern to stern with the exception of her boilers which were used for a short time in the old Casca.

  • August 25, 1911: For the first time in the history of Whitehorse music was furnished in one of her churches, the church of England, last Sunday morning by a fully vested choir of young boys. Rev. Blackwell has organized a good choir and is justifiably proud of the results.
  • August 25, 1911: Having taken retirement discharge from the service of the Royal N. W. M. P., Dr. L. A. Pare, after a residence of twelve years in the territory, all but one of which was spent in Whitehorse, left Wednesday morning for Fort McLeod, Alberta, where he will visit relatives for a few weeks, after which he will make an extended visit to Paris and other European points of interest. Read the entire article here.
  • August 25, 1911: The Midland Railroad. The party which left Haines, Alaska, a month ago for the purpose of meandering the route of the railroad it is proposed to build from salt water at Haines to Fairbanks by way of the Porcupine, the Kluane, the head of the White river and down the Tanana, completed the trip to the head of the Tanana last week. Read the entire article here.

September

  • September 29, 1911: Frederick Tennyson, Liberal, and Dr. Alfred Thompson, Conservative, are nominated for the Yukon Council. Dr. Alfred Thompson wins the October 23 election.

October

  • October 27, 1911: Two new gold dredges are installed by the Yukon Gold company: No. 6 on Bonanza and No. 7 Eldorado.

1912

January

  • January 5, 1912: "Mrs. Idelle Cochran, wife of Howard Cochran, who, with his partner, Theo. Becker, is operating the Whirlwind mine in the Wheaton district, died on Wednesday, December 27th, four hours after giving birth to a girl baby." Although she was buried in Whitehorse, there is no record of her. See more about Howard & Idelle Cochran and daughters.

  • January 26, 1912: George Armstrong is mourning the loss of one of his domesticated foxes, the black one, which escaped from its environment nearly two weeks ago by gnawing a hole in the wire netting which formed the enclosure. As it was the black fox of the pair, the loss to Mr. Armstrong is quite heavy as the skin would have brought him a very fancy price - anywhere from $400 to $750. Read that article and much more in The History of Fox Farming in the Yukon Territory.

February

  • February 2, 1912: George Black is appointed Commissioner of the Yukon.
  • February 2, 1912: The big Caterpillar traction engine being used to haul wood across Lake Bennett to the power plant of the Big Thing Mining company at the mouth of McDonald Creek went through the ice near the mouth of the Watson River. The machine, which was owned by Frank Asam, weighed 16 tons and cost $15,000. It is in over 80 feet of water, and it is not believed that the machine can be recovered.

  • February 9, 1912: A human skeleton wrapped in canvas, found on the shore of Wolf Lake, about 70 miles east of Teslin Post, is thought to be that of J. M. Danielson, though neither he nor his brother have been seen since the Fall of 1910.

  • February 16, 1912: The winter freight and mail division of the WP&YR received 44 horses on the train which arrived in Whitehorse on February 14.

March

  • March 8, 1912: C. E. S. Burch, inventor and builder of the Burch Auto sleigh, took a party out for a trial spin at Carcross a few days ago when the machine proved to be a great success.
  • March 8, 1912: There is enough activity by various miners in the Whitehorse copper belt that The Tyee Copper Company smelter at Ladysmith, BC, is running a display ad noting that they "Pay the Best Price for Copper, Gold and Silver Ores."
  • March 8, 1912: The 11-acre Holland ranch, at Sunnydale near Dawson, has been sold by the public administrator to John Whiteside and Mr. Harrod of Sunnydale, for an average of $400 an acre. The price shows that Yukon has land that is highly valuable for farming purposes. Few lands devoted to such purposes bring better values anywhere.

  • March 22, 1912: George Black is on his first official visit of the Yukon from Ottawa.

April

  • April 12, 1912: E.C. Hawkins, the first general manager of the White Pass & Yukon Route, died in New York on April 9.
  • April 12, 1912: Major Snyder quits the Royal N.W.M.P. after 27 years service.

  • April 19, 1912: Three candidates, William Drury, Captain P. Martin and Willard Leroy Phelps are nominated for the Yukon Council election, Whitehorse district.

May

  • May 10, 1912: "The work of establishing the international boundary line between Alaska and Yukon will be completed this year in time to permit of the survey parties getting out by the latter part of September."
  • May 10, 1912: In the election for 2 members to represent Whitehorse district on the board of the Yukon council, Captain P. Martin receives 153 votes, W. L. Phelps 112 votes and W. Drury 99 votes.
  • May 10, 1912: With the Yukon River open from Lower Lebarge to Dawson, when small boats from Whitehorse reached the frozen lake, "forty to fifty Indians with dog teams were waiting on the edge of the lake ice to transport the passengers and freight across the lake. Several amusing stories are told of how contracts were made and broken by the Indians."

  • May 17, 1912: "Yukon's Greatest Need Is An Overland Trail", starting with a "Passable Automobile Road from Whitehorse to Carmacks"
  • May 17, 1912: An epidemic of measles at Dawson is a great threat to Indians in particular, as they are particularly susceptible to the disease.

June

  • June 7, 1912: Scores of Alaskans have been duped in Florida land purchases that turned out to be worthless land in the Everglades.

  • June 14, 1912: Mount Kamai on the West coast of Alaska is in eruptions and sprinkles white ashes over parts of the Yukon.

  • June 21, 1912: Taylor & Drury, the well-known firm of merchants and general traders, have taken over the Carmacks trading post, including the merchandise and roadhouse business, which concerns have been run since last fall by W. H. Shaw and C. B. Rowlinson and previous to that time by Seymour Rowlinson, who is now engaged in the stationery business in Victoria.

July

  • July 26, 1912: On July 21, a barge being pushed by the steamer Dawson hit the bank of the Thirtymile River. Two wagons carrying parts for a Caterpillar to be used in building the Scroggie Creek road were thrown into the river and lost.

August

  • August 16, 1912: Major John D. Moody, accompanied by his wife, arrived Friday on the way from Regina, headquarters of the Royal N. W. M. P., to Dawson, where he will relieve Major Fitz J. Horrigan as chief officer of the force in Yukon. Major Moody was in Yukon in 1898, coming in via the Edmonton route for the purpose of demonstrating the "All Canadian route" which failed to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the average argonaut. On turning over the office to Maj. Moody, Maj. Horrigan will leave for the outside after twelve years residence in Yukon.
  • August 16, 1912: One morning at the depot recently while a search for gold dust was being conducted by the police a concealed weapon in the shape of a thirty-eight calibre revolver was found on the person of Joseph Tiano, an Italian who had only arrived from Dawson on the way outside. The fellow was taken into custody and luter brought before Police Magistrate Taylor, where he was given an option of paying a stiff fine or going to jail for thirty days. He 'came across' with the money and went his way, the weapon being confiscated to the crown. Indian Drowned
  • August 16, 1912: Indian Drowned. Charles Nassack, better known as John Nassack, was drowned at the Chilcoot cannery yesterday noon. Three natives were in the canoe when it capsized, but Nassack was too old and feeble to make shore with the other occupants.

  • August 30, 1912: Some History of Local Copper Belt. Read the entire article here.

1913

January

  • January 3, 1913: The trail of a huge sulphur-smelling serpent monster was followed for several miles by a party of trappers and hunters east of Marsh Lake. The trail of a similar beast was followed in that area 3 years before, and Indian legends tell of one at Miles Canyon that destroyed a village and ate many people 300 years ago. Read the entire article here.

  • January 10, 1913: $5,250,000 is the output in 1912 of the gold-bearing creeks around Dawson. This is an increase of almost one million dollars compared to 1911.
  • January 31, 1913: "Three Persons Found Cold in Death at Black Hills Stage Post on Whitehorse-Dawson Road." Read two articles about the double murder and suicide here.

February

  • February 14, 1913: White Pass & Yukon Route announces they will build two new steamers for use on the lower Yukon river (Dawson - Fairbanks).

  • February 21, 1913: The King's Cafe is opened in Whitehorse February 16.

March

  • March 7, 1913: Work for the season started at the B. Y. N. shipyards Monday morning, March 8rd, earlier than for many years. While the crew at work is not large at present, it will be greatly increased by the middle of next week and from that time on, perhaps until fall, the yards will be the busiest place in Southern Yukon, with two new steamers being built for the lower Yukon run.
  • March 7, 1913: Adam Dickson, lineman for the Dominion Telegraph at Tagish, arrived on Sunday's train and went at once to the hospital where parts of two toes were amputated by Dr. Clarke. Dickson had his toes frozen while out on the line during the severe weather of January and had been doctoring them himself until he realized that they were beyond saving, He will be out in about three weeks.

  • March 14, 1913: Bill Drury reports that the stampede to Silver Creek, 30 miles back from the east end of Teslin Lake, is not justified - he neither saw nor heard any valid reports of any gold being found.

  • March 21, 1913: Despite Bill Drury's report last week, the headline today is "Teslin Stampede Is Of Big Proportions".
  • March 21, 1913: The United States law pertaining to private drinking cups in railway trains is now in force on the White Pass road and those germ-laden distributors of disease are cached away when the train crosses the line from Canada into the domain of Uncle Sam. There is no law, however, against raising a car window and grabbing a handful of snow to allay the craving of a parched tongue following a night of revelry.

April

  • April 18, 1913: The steamship Princess Sophia hits a rock and goes ashore on Sentinel Island April 13. Nobody is injured.

May

  • May 2, 1913: Over 200 men are at work at the B.Y.N. shipyards, many of them building 2 new steamers, the Alaska and the Yukon.
  • May 2, 1913: Flamboyant former Yukoner Charles Eugene "Count" Carbonneau has again been arrested for fraud, this time in Paris.
  • May 2, 1913: G. P. Colwell, of St. Johns, New Brunswick, representing the Fundy Fox Farming Co., after spending several weeks in Skagway and Southern Yukon, has decided to locate here where a fox farm will be arranged for and conducted. Read that article and much more in The History of Fox Farming in the Yukon Territory.

  • May 30, 1913: Whitehorse druggist H.G. Macpherson was among the people who staked claims on Meander Creek, east of the Hootalinqua River, as the result of a gold discovery.
  • May 30, 1913: Carl Faulk, pioneer fox farmer in the Yukon, having begun about 5 years ago, has returned from the Canyon area on the Kluane trail with 16 fox puppies for his operation at Carcross.
  • May 30, 1913: Mrs. Ruth Kelsey died on May 28 as the result of burns sustained when a bottle of gasoline exploded at her Dominion Hotel on May 17. The hotel was destroyed in the fire. Read several articles here.

August

  • August 1, 1913: The richest discovery of placer in the North in the last years is reported from the creeks tributary to the Tanana river, Sushana, Bonanza, Eldorado and Flat.

November

  • November 7, 1913: John Burke, member of the Yukon Order of Pioneers and veteran of the Fortymile Circle, died on September 28.

December

  • December 19, 1913: A new camp developed over the summer of 1913 as the result of a stampede to the Chisana area.

1914

January

  • January 2, 1914: "Practically all the adult population of Whitehorse" attends the Grand Ball given by the lodge of the Loyal Order of Moose.

  • January 30, 1914: The steamship Princess Sophia runs once again ashore, this time at Alert Bay. Passengers are all transferred to the steamship Alki.
  • January 30, 1914: The U.S. Senate passes the Alaska railroad bill. The new bill contains a number of amendments, among others concerning the lease of the railroad and injured employees
  • January 30, 1914: Sir Richard McBride, premier of British Columbia, expresses his opinion in favour of annexing the Yukon.

February

  • February 13, 1914: The rate war which was waged on the river last season by the Sidestreams Navigation company and Northern Navigation company on one side and the British Yukon Navigation and Alaska Yukon Navigation companies on the other, will be resumed this season with the opening of navigation according to Captain Sid Barrington, manager of the Sidestreams company.
  • February 13, 1914: A rich strike has been made on O'Donnell creek which is about twenty five miles from Atlin. According to Prof. L.C. Read, some portions of O'Donnell creek are as rich as the best claims ever worked in the Dawson neighborhood.
  • February 13, 1914: E.J. White, editor of The Star, spent some time in Victoria with his family in November, and a long list of former Yukoners now living there is printed. Read the entire article here.

  • February 20, 1914: Reverend John Hawsksley, rector of the Church of England at Dawson, is appointed Indian superintendent for the Yukon Territory, effective March 1.
  • February 20, 1914: The Southern Yukon Conservative Association, founded in Whitehorse in 1913, grows rapidly. It has 81 members and is at that time the largest club of the kind in the history of Whitehorse and Southern Yukon.

March

  • March 6, 1914: The real estate building on Front Street known as the Captain H.F. Siewerd property, is purchased by E.J. Hamacher who will occupy the building as a photograph gallery and art studio.

April

  • April 10, 1914: The Yukon Council sends a memorial to Ottawa emphasizing the importance of road between Skagway and Whitehorse. The Council receives support from the Southern Yukon Conservative Association.

  • April 24, 1914: Whitehorse, from present indications, gives promise of becoming the center of one of the biggest industries of the present age, that of fox breeding and raising. Already one company has been formed, backed by a number of the most prominent men in the territory, and arrangements are under way for the formation of another which will likely be followed by others in the future. Read that article and much more in The History of Fox Farming in the Yukon Territory.

May

  • May 22, 1914: The boating season starts with the steamer Vidette.

  • May 29, 1914: Most of the business section of Atlin was destroyed by a fire on May 24.

June

  • June 5, 1914: The fifty Russians who had been here for two weeks previous to Monday preparing for a prospecting trip up the White river, got away in their three wonderfully designed and constructed boats Monday evening at 8:30 o'clock when the son of Manager Mischenko who had the misfortune to fire a bullet through his right foot a week previous, was sufficiently recovered to accompany them.
  • June 5, 1914: The worst marine disaster since wreck of the Titanic two years ago occurred last Friday morning in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Quebec, when the C. P. R. steamer Empress of Ireland was rammed amidships by the Danish collier Storstadt during a dense fog. The Empress sank in fourteen minutes after the collision and according to latest report, nine hundred and sixty nine lives were lost.
  • June 5, 1914: Navigation and the fox season are both open, the former scoring one day in advance of the latter. The B.Y.N. steamer Canadian passed through the lake the evening and night of May 31, arriving at Whitehorse at 2:30 a. m. of the 1st June, the earliest, except the year 1902, a steamer has ever crossed Lake Lebarge.

July

  • July 10, 1914: A terrible tragedy took place early last Saturday morning, July 4th, when a gasoline launch, the Superb, capsized three miles below Skagway, throwing all her passengers into the icy waters from which only eight escaped, the other twelve all being drowned. Read the entire article here.
  • July 10, 1914: Mrs. Nellie Piper Rosenberg, 20 years old, died at her home on July 8th, her trouble being diabetes. Read the entire article here.
  • July 10, 1914: Albert, the eldest child of Captain and Mrs. George McMaster, died at Dawson, presumably Tuesday night or Wednesday. Captain McMaster is master of the steamer Selkirk. Albert was between twelve and fourteen years of age and was a fine, manly lad. The home of the family is at Wenatchee, Wash., but they always come north during the season of navigation when the captain is employed on the river.

August

  • August 21, 1914: Dr. Alfred Thompson, Yukon MP, leaves Dawson to go to war. He will serve as physician and surgeon in the British army.

September

  • September 25, 1914: Matthew Watson, owner of the store in Carcross, married Miss McLaren in Dawson on September 14th.

October

  • October 9, 1914: George J. Milton, general manager of the Five Fingers Coal Company at Tantalus, reports a very successful season, with new machinery installed and the quality of coal increasing with depth.
  • October 9, 1914: A lodge of the Yukon Order of Pioneers is formed at Whitehorse on October 2. The officers elected were: President, W. A. Puckett; Vice President, E. J. White; Secretary, W. W. Dickenson; Treasurer, W. C. Sime; Warden, C. H. Johnston; Chaplain, Isaac Taylor; Guard, Captain P. Martin.

  • October 16, 1914: "The steamer Lightning, with the Boyle Yukon contingent on board, is due here from Dawson tomorrow night. The company has not yet been mobilized nor will it be until the men reach Victoria. There are forty of them on the steamer."

November

  • November 6, 1914: O.L. Dickeson, head of the White Pass & Yukon Route, resigns from his position, effective January 1, 1915.

December

  • December 18, 1914: The most disastrous fire in Skagway since the town was founded in 1897 occurred on December 12th. Moore's Wharf and several buildings were burned to the ground.

1915

January

  • January 1, 1915: Whitehorse-Kluane Stage Line. The Royal Mail Stage leaves Whitehorse the fourth of every month for Kluane and way points and also on the seventeenth of every month for Champagne. Passengers & Freight Solicited. H. Chambers, Prop.

February

  • February 19, 1915: Both parties - Conservatives and Liberals nominate their candidates for the Yukon Council. The Conservatives nominate Dr. J.O. Lachappelle and Howard Pearse (North Dawson), W.G. Radford and Dr. A.J. Gillis (South Dawson), G.N. Williams and J. Turner (Bonanza), Archie Martin and John F. McCrimmon (Klondike). The Liberals nominate Paul Guite and W.J. O'Brien (North Dawson), Captain L.G. Bennett and N. Watt (South Dawson), F. Hales and D. Robertson (Bonanza), R.W. Fraser and M. Landreville (Klondike). On March 4, 1915, Edward A. Dixon (Conservative) and Willard L. Phelps (Liberal) are elected as Southern Yukon representatives for the Yukon Council. They defeat Patrick Martin. O'Brien and Guite win in North Dawson. South Dawson is won by Radford and Watt. Fraser and McCrimmon win the Klondike riding, Robinson and Williams the Bonanza riding.

March

  • March 12, 1915: The Southern Yukon Mining and Industrial Association is formed March 5.
  • March 12, 1915: New Councillor-elect Edward A. Dixon is Pioneer resident of the Yukon.

April

  • April 9, 1915: The Yukon sees the earliest breaking up of the ice on the Yukon, on March 6th.

  • April 16, 1915: Whitehorse gets an additional grant of $18,000 for the new hospital.
  • April 16, 1915: Whitehorse man J.H. Sherman completes his invention of a new block system for railroads. The present system of "blocking" trains has one small light to signal danger ahead. By the Sherman invention from three to six distinct electric bell signals, in addition to the light, are given.

June

  • June 11, 1915: A.E. Acland, inspector of the R. N.W.M.P., is transferred to Winnipeg.

September

  • September 17, 1915: Byron N. White, owner of several copper properties in the Whitehorse area, died on September 12th.

October

  • October 1, 1915: Alex Gagoff shoots 4 WP&YR railroad crew members. The news of the tragedy is brought to Whitehorse by Gagoff himself. He is sentenced (October 22) to death by hanging - the execution was carried out on March 10, 1916.

  • October 22, 1915: Judge G. L. Taylor dies on October 21st.

November

  • November 12, 1915: "A bunch of Indians arrived in town Tuesday evening of this week with a big consignment of moose and mountain sheep meat. The former is being sold around town at 15 and the latter at 25 cents per pound. Some of the meat brought in by Indians has the appearance of having been towed a la drag from where it was killed."

December

  • December 10, 1915: The new General Hospital in Whitehorse is completed.

1916

January

  • January 7, 1916: Details are given of the death of Ginger Stewart of Whitehorse in the trenches of France on November 23, 1915.

February

  • February 18, 1916: Martha Black is elected a life member of the national chapter of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire of Canada.

March

  • March 10, 1916: "The Stroller", E.J. White, announces in his column that he is going to be leaving the Yukon after nearly 12 years in Whitehorse and a total of 16½ years in the territory.

  • March 17, 1916: A. M. Rousseau is now editor of The Weekly Star - the March 17th edition is the final one compiled by E.J. White.

June

  • June 16, 1916: Cassie Henderson, daughter of Robert Henderson, is married on the steamer Casca June 15.

September

  • September 1, 1916: The Conservatives win the prohibition plebiscite on August 30, in an extreme close election. The majority of 3 votes is contested by the Liberals. A recount is refused.

  • September 8, 1916: Thomas W. O'Brien, one of the pioneers of the Yukon, dies in Dawson August 24.

  • September 13, 1916: Joseph Whiteside Boyle of Dawson receives the honor of lieutenant-colonel in the Canadian militia. In December 1917, Joe Boyle is decorated in Petrograd with the Order of St. Staislaus for distinguished service in the transportation department of the Russian army in Galicia and Rumania.

  • September 15, 1916: There is an epidemic of measles among the inhabitants of the Indian village north of Whitehorse.

  • September 22, 1916: The new high school addition to the Whitehorse public school building is completed.

October

  • October 27, 1916: George Norris Williams is appointed administrator for the Yukon Territory, with the power and authority of the commissioner. Captain George Black still remains commissioner during his war service overseas.
  • October 27, 1916: The last river boats, The Dawson and Nasutlin, arrive in Whitehorse on October 23, closing the navigation season.

December

  • December 15, 1916: The 1916 mining season has been greater in the Atlin district than any other year since the big rush in 1898.

1917

January

  • January 5, 1917: During 1916 the exports from Southern Yukon amount to approximately $1,000,000, $94,000 being raw furs and the other $906,000 copper and other ores. All of the furs and about 50 per cent of the ores were exported to the U.S. and the remainder of the ores to smelters in British Columbia.

  • January 5, 1917: January 12, 1917: White Pass & Yukon Route announces December 20, 1916 the construction of two new steamers to take care of its increasing tourist traffic between Caribou and Taku and on Atlin lake.

  • January 5, 1917: January 26, 1917: The Boyle Yukon Motor Machine Gun Battery, recruited in Dawson, is awarded a military cross and military medals.

February

  • February 23, 1917: A fire that broke out in the Yukonia hotel in Dawson on February 21st destroyed an entire block of business houses. Among the burned building are the Yukonia, Pioneer, Bonanza and Cronin hotels, Sales' jewelry store and Pinska's clothing store.

March

  • March 16, 1917: While in Whitehorse last week, testing the ores from the Conrad district, H. W. Newton, the oil flotation expert for the Lakinaw & Tagish Mines Co., made the statement to a prominent copper mine owner of the Whitehorse district, that an oil flotation plant, with a capacity of 100 tons of ore per day, could be put in here at an approximate cost of $20,000, and that such a plant could be placed in operation within 90 days from the time of the commencement of work.

June

  • June 15, 1917: The B.Y.N. steamer Tutshi is launched at Carcross, June 12, christened by Mazie Cochran.

July

  • July 6, 1917: Katherine Ryan, representing Whitehorse, takes the part of "Miss Canada" at a celebration in Skagway.

August

  • August 24, 1917: There is a new stampede, this time to a creek in the Hutshi Lake Region.

September

  • September 14, 1917: There are several successful fox ranchers in Southern Yukon, and some of them are located in the vicinity of Whitehorse. Two of the most up-to-date of these are the J. P. Whitney & Co. Black & Silver Fox Farm and the Whitehorse Silver Black Fox Co.'s farm, both of which raise not only foxes but also rabbits and Belgian hares to feed the foxes. Read that article and much more in The History of Fox Farming in the Yukon Territory.

November

  • November 2, 1917: The launch Falcon, which left here October 19th, was located at the mouth of the White river where they were held up by floating ice. The first class mail was forwarded on to Dawson in charge of Capt. Hoggan by single horse to Black Hills creek over the Henderson Divide, and the balance of the mail and express will be taken on to Stewart City where it will be met with teams of the White Pass company, now en route to that point from Dawson.
  • November 2, 1917: The Royal Mail auto running between Whitehorse and Champagne Landing left here Monday with Chauffer Hardy in the driver's seat.
  • November 2, 1917: President Elliott of the W. P. & Y. R., who had been here for several days, left Thursday morning for Carcross for the purpose of inspecting the Tutshi, the fine new passenger steamer of the company, built last summer to accommodate the tourist trade to Atlin, and which he had never before seen.
  • November 2, 1917: There was such a severe storm on Atlin lake the fore part of the week that the White Pass steamer Tarahne had to lay to at the dock until its abatement.

  • November 9, 1917: The public meeting at the N. S. A. A. hall Tuesday night was fairly well attended, a number of ladies being among those present. Chas. H. Johnston, president of the Whitehorse Conservative association, announced dissolution of that organization, with a view of forming a Unionist association in Southern Yukon, with which citizens, irrespective of party politics, could affiiliate. W. D. Gordon, Conservative, was then chosen unanimously as chairman of the meeting and H. G. MacPherson, Liberal, as secretary.
  • November 9, 1917: If the war should continue much longer, (which God forbid) the question of a possible shortage of food would become very grave. It is commonly understood that a considerable proportion of big game is wantonly destroyed during the winter, and as, in this territory, such a source of food would be invaluable in given circumstances, I respectfully suggest the adoption of the obvious remedy.

  • November 16, 1917: The future of the mines in the Whitehorse copper belt certainly looks promising. Among the positive news, development work at the Copper King mine has uncovered an extensive body of high grade bornite and copper glance ore on the 150 foot level.
  • November 16, 1917: Jake Fred and Frank Smith make a new gold strike at Dalton Post.

  • November 23, 1917: Miner George Russell Clark, who has been in the Yukon country for the past 19 years, claims to have invented a projectile with one-half greater penetrating power than any now in use and which will increase the range of the gun from which it is fired, with the same amount of powder now used as a charge, at least 30 per cent. He says that his invention, if adopted by the military and naval authorities, will revolutionize artillery warfare. He also has an invention in aeronautic machinery that he thinks is destined to astonish the world at some not distant date.
  • November 23, 1917: A quiet but pretty wedding was solemnized at the residence of Mrs. Ellen Evans in Port Arthur, when her third daughter, Lucy, was married to William Stephenson Drury of Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.

  • November 30, 1917: A northern blizzard, that dropped the mercury from 20 above to 20 below in a few hours, struck Whitehorse early Tuesday morning and has been busy ever since. Considerable snow fell in the early stages of the blow and has badly drifted in many places since.
  • November 30, 1917: The river closed at Whitehorse at about 2 a. m. yesterday, and at Yukon Crossing about the same time.

December

  • December 7, 1917: The parents of Frank Wilson have just received a letter from him in which he states he has so far recovered from his wounds, which were not serious, that he is now able to be around. The wounds were caused by shrapnel, and were received at the battle of Paschendaele ridge.
  • December 7, 1917: With a denial of his guilt and the words of the song "Jesus Loves Me, This I Know," his last earthly utterances, Roy Yoshioko stood on the gallows on November 23rd and his soul was plunged into eternity. He was executed in the jail yard at Dawson this morning before the break of day. He was convicted or murdering his wife Hisa at West Dawson in June. Her unborn child also died, and an Indian, Percy James, was also found dead at their home.

1918

January

  • January 4, 1918: Charley Chinnery, veteran White Pass stage driver between here and Dawson, after going through a month of 40 to 86 degrees below zero weather on his last round trip to the Yukon metropolis, arrived in Whitehorse unscathed by the Frost King on Tuesday of last week, only to go through the painful experience of having the tip of his nose frosted on the following Saturday while walking up Front street from the White Pass barns to the depot with the thermometer registering only 10 below zero.
  • January 4, 1918: Hundreds of telegrams were received on December 25th by the government from the temperance people throughout Canada, congratulating the ministers for passing the order-in-council Saturday which after April next means practically Dominion-wide prohibition.

February

  • February 1, 1918: Alfred Thompson wins the Yukon election for the member of parliament, defeating Frederick Congdon.

  • February 15, 1918: The Yukon Chapter of the I.O.D.E. elects its officers. Isaac Taylor is the regent, F. Wilson is the 1st vice regent, Miss Smith is the 2nd vice regent.

  • February 22, 1918: Canada removes the embargo against the export of tungsten and molybdenum. The removal allows the Yukon to export these ores.

March

  • March 1, 1918: While the men employed at the Copper King were at their midday meal Saturday fire broke out in the power house of the mine and before it was discovered had yained such headway there was no chance either of saving the building or salvaging its contents from the ravages of the flames. The building destroyed was about 50x50 feet in size, and was used as power house, boiler room and blacksmith shop. It is thought that the blaze originated from a carbide lamp left burning by its owner while he was at his meal.
  • March 1, 1918: Lovell C. Jefferson is on his way outside for the purpose of offering his services to Uncle Sam in any capacity and in any department where most needed. Although a resident of Whitehorse, he was the second man to register when the list was opened at Skagway and has been arranging to go outside ever since for enlistment. He is a printer by trade and for the past two years has been associated with his father in the publishing of the Weekly Star.
  • March 1, 1918: Officials of the Canadian government have become apprehensive as to the well being of Louis Dixon, deputy collector of customs at the Boundary. Chas. Roos was sent to the Boundary to learn if all is well with Mr. Dixon, taking with him Star and Bob, the two famous sledge dogs of L. T. Watson, but he was unable to reach Boundary because of so much snow. He will leave again tomorrow, with two men.

April

  • April 5, 1918: Federal estimates reduce Yukon annual grant forty-two per cent. The offices of commissioner and administrator at Dawson, assistant gold commissioner at Whitehorse, and mining recorder at Mayo and Glacier are abolished and the respective officers are dismissed, effective as of April 1st. Gold Commissioner George Mackenzie is the new administrator of the territory.
  • April 5, 1918: Word has been received that the Seventeenth Yukon Machine Gun battery, commanded by Captain George Black, has been moved to Seaforth, England, from Whitley. The Fifth Battalion, to which the company was attached, has been broken up. It is expected that this change is preliminary to the movement of the Seventeenth Company soon to France.
  • April 5, 1918: Many nations have now adopted the plan of putting their clocks one hour ahead during the summer months. The White Pass line commenced on Tuesday to adopt the system and has put its clocks forward one hour to correspond with the time now kept by the boats at Skagway. There have been many suggestions made that Whitehorse follow suit.

  • April 12, 1918: A flying machine with a capacity of fifty passengers is projected for service between Dawson and Skagway. It is said that the promoter of the plan believes an aircraft suitable for this service can be secured, and that it will be able to make the trip, one way, in four hours. Read the entire article here.
  • April 12, 1918: Robert Lowe came down from his wood camp near the Venus mine, in the Conrad district, Friday. He left Sam McGee in charge of the wood camp. Wednesday of last week a valuable horse belonging to one of Mr. Lowe's work teams died from the after effects of exposure last December in the extremely cold weather on the lake.
  • April 12, 1918: Last Sunday was a lovely day and many of our townspeople took advantage of the warm sunshine to auto down the river over the smooth, broad ice trail left by the White Pass caterpillar on its way to Lower Lebarge.

  • April 19, 1918: The Vancouver Province of April 4 announced the death in action on March 24 of 21-year-old Lieut. W. Hilliard Snyder, son of Major A. E. Snyder, retired from the R. N. W. M. P. Major Snyder was commanding officer of H. Division, R. N. W. M. P., and lived here with his family consisting of wife, daughter and son, for several years subsequent to 1901, when he took charge. Mrs. Snyder died several years ago in Vancouver, where the family had made their home after leaving Whitehorse. Major Snyder's daughter is now driving an ambulance in France.
  • April 19, 1918: T. A. Dickson, Kluane lake homesteader, hunter, trapper and game warden, arrived in Whitehorse Saturday by dog team, accompanied by Dick Fullerton, Burwash creek miner, who has held down claims on that creek ever since its discovery. Dickson's eldest child, a daughter of 14 years of age, accompanied them, but had to be left at Champagne Landing on account of a sore throat and a high feyer she had contracted on the long, cold journey from the foot of the lake, a distance of about 150 miles.
  • April 19, 1918: Entire Family Goes to War. Dr. R. B. Coutts, former well known Klondike surgeon, Mrs. Coutts and her son, Eddie, are all in the war servive, The doctor is a veterinary surgeon in the British forces in Italy, and has the rank of captain. Mrs. Coutts is working in a hospital in England. Eddie is in the Canadian flying corps, now training on this side of the water.

  • April 26, 1918: Forty eight parcels soldier's comforts were mailed last week to our men in France by the Yukon Chapter of the I. O. D. E.
  • April 26, 1918: The train arriving from Skagway Tuesday brought Pte. Frank Wilson, the first returning Whitehorse volunteer from the western front, and as he stepped from the car and was clasped in a loving mother's arms, felt the hearty hand-grip and heard the appreciative words of the friends, both old and young, whom he had left behind, he forgot for the time being the horrors of the hell he had left far overseas - the incessant roar of the big guns that thunder a constant requiem for the slain, the airplanes darting overhead in flight swifter than that of the carrier-pigeon, the nightly brilliant flare of the electric light over No Man's Land, and the groans of the wounded and dying on that drear, desolate and war-scarred waste - and remembered only that he was back in the land he loved.
  • April 26, 1918: Tuesday eight feet of new snow fell at the summit of the White Pass. In Whitehorse the same day there was a fall of snow for several hours, but the now melted almost as soon as it reached the ground, and is now all gone, leaving us only the old snow which is fast disappearing.

May

  • May 3, 1918: Saturday night a Buda gas car came in from Carcross, having on board J. F. Wikidal, vice-president and general manager, and T. B. Landers, general superintendent of the Venus Mines Co., in the Conrad district, W. S. McGee, foreman of Robert Lowe's wood camp near Conrad, and John Williams, foreman of the White Pass section gang at Carcross. They all came down to be present at the farewell dance tendered to Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Miller and family by the citizens of Whitehorse.

June

  • June 28, 1918: The first draft boys leave the Yukon for training camps; 95 men are enrolled in Yukon's quota of troops for overseas service.

July

  • July 26, 1918: With tender and impressive rites, all that is mortal of Mrs. Hugh Quinn Cutting (Bessie Lucile Cutting) was laid to rest the afternoon of July 15th in the Masonic cemetery at Dawson. The funeral was attended by hundreds of the best known of Dawson's people. The christening of her daughter was held the previous afternoon.
  • July 26, 1918: The embargo against the importation of fruit and other vegetables into the Yukon is another of the absurdities imposed upon the people of the Klondike by a board ignorant of the conditions of this remote district. Fruits and vegetables brought here from the coast are held up at this end because of the arbitrary ruling of some board thousands of miles away, and may rot before they are released, and possibly they never will be released.
  • July 26, 1918: Col. Joseph W. Boyle, formerly of Dawson, Y. T., who is connected with the Canadian troops, has been decorated by King Ferdinand of Rumania, for having saved prominent Rumanians from capture at the hands of the Bolsheviki.

August

  • August 2, 1918: The firm of Greime & Smith, dealers in men's clothing, furnishings, boots and shoes, for years one of the business standbys of Whitehorse, announce a clearance of their entire stock and their retirement from business.
  • August 2, 1918: Early Saturday morning Dawson John, an Indian, arrived in town and reported to the police that the day before he had accidentally shot and killed his hunting companion, Joe Jacky, another Indian, while the two were moose hunting on the McClintock river.

September

  • September 20, 1918: Jim Hall, former owner of claim No. 17, Eldorado, which produced more than 2 million dollars, commits suicide in Valejo, California.

  • September 27, 1918: The Carcross church, which lately has been closed for repairs, was re-opened for service on the 15th, Rev. John Hawksley officiating, and delivering a fine sermon. W. H. Simpson, who has been doing the repairs, is to be congratulated on the improvements he has made. The interior has all been beaverboarded, and a chancel and vestry added at the east end. The arrival of a stained memorial window will complete the edifice.

November

  • November 1, 1918: On October 24th, the Princess Sophia runs onto Vanderbilt reef in Lynn canal, 65 miles south of Skagway. Passengers remain on the vessel as there appears to be no danger. A day later, bad weather and enormous waves swept the Sophia across the reef, filling it up with icy water. The Princess Sophia sank within minutes, causing the death of more than 350 passengers.
  • November 1, 1918: Bishop Stringer receives a honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity at Wycliffe College for his missionary work in the Arctic, in particular on Herschel Island.

  • November 8, 1918: Whitehorse is the first community to hoist the governor general's flag in the north. Whitehorse receives this honor for the number of recruits sent to the front and for generous contributions to war relief work.

December

  • December 6, 1918: The I.O.D.E. room in the public library is officially opened on November 30.

1919

January

  • January 10, 1919: A monument to the memory of Southern Yukon men who died in the battle fields in Europe is unveiled at the cemetery December 8. The first donation towards the monument is made by Mr. and Mrs. E.J. White.

  • January 24, 1919: The Yukon Development League was organized in Dawson on January 21st. The object of the organization is to secure development in the Yukon.

February

  • February 14, 1919: News from Dawson on January 30th that trapper Bob Levac narrowly escaped death when mauled by a grizzly near Fraser Falls in the Stewart River country. Intervention by his dog no doubt saved him, but the bear killed the heroic dog. Levac was able to reach Mayo, 20 miles away, by dog sled for assistance.
  • February 14, 1919: Venus Mine which was closed in 1918, is leased to Montana parties and resumes work June 1st.
  • February 14, 1919: A series of brief articles report on divers exploring the wreck of the Princess Sophia in search of more bodies. The bodies of two women have been spotted but recovery has not been possible.

  • February 28, 1919: A report from the British Air Ministry predicts that large freight airships, 1,100 feet long and capable of carrying 200 tons vast distances, will be a reality.
  • February 28, 1919: Juneau fur dealer Chas. Goldstein & Co. is offering $5-20 for wolf pelts, $35-37.50 for large lynx, and $50-100 for cross fox.

March

  • March 7, 1919: A lengthy editorial argues against the "hysterical and unreasoning fear" that had quarantines and travel restrictions put in place. Read the entire article here.
  • March 7, 1919: On Feb. 17 Peter Jackson, an Alaskan native of Klawock village near the town of Craig, shot and instantly killed the deputy U. S. marshal who had him under arrest, The murderer escaped and for several days evaded capture, but finally, when he found that his apprehension by the authorities was certain, turned the gun on himself and thus ended the affair.
  • March 7, 1919: Monday afternoon about 3 o'clock fire was discovered in the attic of the Chooutla Indian school at Carcross, and for a time it looked as though the entire structure was doomed. Owing, however, to the aid of the citizens of Carcross, who rushed to the scene as soon as the alarm was given, the blaze was gotten under control with only slight damage to the roof of the building. There was also some damage occasioned by water.

  • March 14, 1919: A grand reception to welcome our returned soldiers was held at the Caribou hotel, Carcross, on Thursday last. The guests of honor were Aubrey Simmons, Fred Maclennan, Ike Gillespie and Alf. Dickson. There were 47 present, which consisted of the entire population and then some.

  • March 21, 1919: Billy Taylor, former superintendent of the river division of the White Pass & Yukon Route Company, died in Seattle on March 15.

April

  • April 18, 1919: A strike of rich ore is made at the Copper King mine.
  • April 18, 1919: Between 200 and 250 Inuit children in the region around Nome and St. Michael have been left orphans by an influenza epidemic.

  • April 25, 1919: The Yukon Chapter of the I.O.D.E. gives a reception and dance at the N.S.A.A. hall on April 24th in honor of Canadian and American returned soldiers.

June

  • June 20, 1919: Saturday night the owners of automobiles of this place met and formed an organization to be known as The Southern Yukon Automobile Club. J. C. Newmarch was elected president, Dr. A. P. Hawes, secretary-treasurer, W. A. Puckett, Isaac Taylor and L. B. Davis, members of executive committee.
  • June 20, 1919: E. J. Hamacher left Sunday in his launch Whitehorse for the mouth of Big Salmon with a supply of gasoline for the White Pass mail boat in eharge of Ike Seavers, which was lvid up there on account of lack of fuel. Mr. Hamacher returned on the Casca Wednesday, leaving his launch at Big Salmon to be brought back by the steamer Dawson.

  • June 27, 1919: With over 200 visitors the "Festival of Midnight Sun" is a great success.

July

  • July 4, 1919: The steamers Casca and Yukon returned on June 30th. They had sailed on June 18th with about 70 tourists each, bound for Fort Yukon on a Midnight Sun tour.
  • July 4, 1919: On July 1st, 50-year-old Pete Peterson, a brakeman on the Scotia Bay-Taku portage railway line between Taku and Atlin lake, was instantly killed at Scotia Bay by being run over by an engine.
  • July 4, 1919: After thoroughly overhauling, repairing and repainting his new purchase, the speedy gasoline launch "Twilight," W. L. Phelps had Robt. Lowe haul the boat to the head of Miles Canyon by team Sunday afternoon and then ran it 80 miles to Carcross.

  • July 18, 1919: The White Pass Hotel changes hands and is now under the management of Mrs. Viaux.

  • July 25, 1919: The steamer Selkirk sailed for Dawson on the 18th, towing the barge Tahkeena which, carrying 157 tons of rails and fittings, is destined for Alaska Railroad construction at Nenana.

August

  • August 1, 1919: The Yukon Territory, during the war, contributed more money per capita to the various relief funds than any other province in Canada.

September

  • September 5, 1919: All bars are closed in Dawson on September 2nd. The Weekly Star writes: The "closing of [the] bars [is] marked by freedom from dunkeness".

  • September 12, 1919: Telephones are installed along the telegraph lines at Carmacks, Yukon Crossing, Selkirk, Beaton's Wood Camp, Coffee Creek and Stewart City.

October

  • October 10, 1919: The last steamer of the season is the Nasutlin, leaving Dawson for Mayo on September 30.
  • October 10, 1919: The Royal Alexandra hotel in Dawson is re-opened.

  • October 17, 1919: James P. Rogers, superintendent at White Pass & Yukon Route for seven years, died in Spokane, Washington, on October 8th.

November

  • November 7, 1919: Rev. W. E. Dunham, pastor of the Sixth Avenue Methodist chureh in Vancouver, died in that city on Oct. 27th of diphtheria. He was pastor of the Dawson Methodist church for several years previous to 1911, and left there for Cranbrook, where he Was stationed for some time, and afterward was promoted to the important post in Vancouver which he held at the time of his death.
  • November 7, 1919: Capt. Wm. Turnbull died very suddenly from heart failure at his home in Vancouver on the morning of Oct. 30. He had only reached there from Whitehorse the night before his death. Capt. Turnbull was one of the best known steamboat men on the Upper Yukon river, and had been with the B. Y. N. Co. ever since it first started to operate between here and Dawson.

December

  • December 12, 1919: "Buzzsaw" Jimmy Richards severely injures his leg with a revolving saw while investigating the machinery without shutting the power off.

  • December 19, 1919: The Prince of Wales honour flag, awarded to Whitehorse for generous contribution to the 1919 Victory Loan, is flying at the top of the Canadian Bank of Commerce flag pole.


Continue to January 1920