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The Whitehorse Star, January 21, 1910


Highlights of History from The Whitehorse Star, 1910-1919


Highlights of History from The Whitehorse Star

Explorer's Guides to Yukon Communities



1910

January

  • January 7, 1910: The Weekly Star publishes Bishop Stringer's story of survival thanks to eating his mucklucks and moccasins.
  • January 14, 1910: "Swiftwater Bill" turns up in the Andes mountains in Peru where he is examining a placer mine.
  • January 14, 1910: Haines, Alaska is incorporated after a favourable plebiscite.
  • January 14, 1910: George Black and Frank McDougal of Dawson are admitted to the bar in Vancouver, B.C. on December 16. They both plan to return to Dawson.
  • January 14, 1910: John C. Ross, old time Dawson man, has been throwing money away in Victoria, by the thousands of dollars daily, and is now being held for insanity.
  • January 28, 1910: English and American capitalists are at present perfecting plans ti build a railway from Winnipeg to the Yukon.

February

  • February 11, 1910: Thomas Kendrick, an old section man employed at the summit of the White Pass, met his death last Saturday morning by being run down by the rotary snow plow when he was unable to climb out from the high snow banks lining the track. Read the entire article here
  • February 25, 1910: The Ice Carnival in Whitehorse on February 18 a big success.

April

  • April 1, 1910: After preparatory work, active building operations on the White Pass & Yukon Route railroad spur into the Whitehorse copper belt begins. About 30 labourers from Skagway got off the train at Ear Lake and took two W. P. & Y. sleighs to the new Grafter Camp near the Grafter Mine.

June

  • June 17, 1910: River navigation for the season is fully opened.
  • June 24, 1910: The Casca bumps into a rock and sinks in seven feet of water in the Thirty-mile river on June 22. The steamer was recovered.

July

  • July 29, 1910: Heavy rains wash out highways and bridges in Southern Yukon. It is the worst weather related damage to occur in the Yukon. The damage is estimated at $25,000.

August

  • August 26, 1910: Beginning August 20, regular shipments of ore are made from the Pueblo mine to Skagway.

September

  • September 2, 1910: The steamer Kluahne is constructed for Taylor & Drury.
  • September 30, 1910: Through the representation of Bishop Stringer, the Dominion government devotes $30,000 to the erection of a territorial mission school for Indians at Carcross.
  • September 30, 1910: Owing to the fact that Skagway has no bank as of October 1, the White Pass & Yukon Route make arrangements to establish their own accomodation bank.

October

  • October 21, 1910: The Lafrance is the last steamer of the season, leaving from Dawson October 20 and arriving in Whitehorse October 25.

November

  • November 18, 1910: The government wagon bridge across the Caribou arm at Carcross is completed October 14.

1911

January

  • January 6, 1911: Attorney R. L. Ashbaugh, dean of the Dawson bar and member of the Yukon council, for the Bonanza district, dies January 3.

  • January 20, 1911: An agreement is reached between Canada and the U.S. to create an international railroad commission to control the border railways.

March

  • March 10, 1911: The police patrol from Fort Macpherson is overdue. More than a month later, the bodies of these four members of the R.N.W.M.P. winter patrol on their way from Fort MacPherson to Dawson are found near the mouth of the Mackenzie river (April 21). The bodies were found by a relief party which left Dawson February 28 to seek for the missing patrol which at that time was six weeks overdue.

  • March 24, 1911: Harry "Snowslide" Esquigge, who obtained his cognomen from sliding down a mountain side in an avalanche of several thousand tons of snow and lived to relate the experience of the trip, and Alex. Fisher, who has been mining on Sheep Creek for the past several years, reached town Monday. Esquigge has been mining on Fourth of July for several years.
  • March 24, 1911: Mr. Robert W. Service, whose latest book "The Trail of Ninety-eight" has met with much favour, is taking a well-earned rest at his mother's ranch some sixty miles out of Edmonton, Alberta. It is his purpose to remain there for several months and, as he says, enjoy the simple life.

April

  • April 14, 1911: The city of Iditarod, Alaska, has been destroyed by fire.
  • April 21, 1911: The bodies of four members of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police which composed the winter patrol party which was to come to Dawson from Fort Macpherson, near the mouth of the Mackenzie river, have been found. On December 22, Inspector Fitzgerald, in charge of the party, Constables Carter, Taylor and Kinuey with an Indian guide left Fort Macpherson for Dawson, a distance of approximately 550 miles. They had three teams of five dogs each and expected to reach Dawson about the middle of January, having with them provisions sufficient to last from 28 to 25 days, the length of time it was supposed would be consumed in making the journey.
  • April 28, 1911: Arnold L. Berdoe, general manager of the White Pass & Yukon Route leaves the company after 5 years on the job. Soon after (May 12), vice president Dickeson is appointed the new general manager.

May

  • May 5, 1911: Frederick Sargent, aged 93 years, died at Kodiak, Alaska, on March 15. He is survived by a wife and seven children. Mr. Sargent was undoubtedly the oldest white man in Alaska at the time of his death. We have reproduced this and several other articles from this issue - see them here.
  • May 12, 1911: One of the biggest mining deals in the history of the Yukon is closed when Daniel Guggenheim takes over the entire holdings of the National Trust Company of Toronto in the Yukon Territory.
  • May 26, 1911: Two Seattle aviators, Fred Weisman and Charles L. Young, are anxious to come to Whitehorse and give a flying exhibition. Read the entire article here.
  • May 26, 1911: River Disasters Very Numerous. Steamer Lafrance, Owned By Captain Syd Barrington, Burned to Waters Edge After Striking Rock In Thirtymile River - Two Barges Wrecked Below Hootalinqua - Slight Accident to Steamer Pauline - Other Craft Reaches Dawson Safely - Ice On Lake Labarge Holds Solid.

June

  • June 2, 1911: Due to continued cold weather, the water in the river at Whitehorse is still 6 inches too low to allow for any steamers to leave. The White Horse, Dawson, and Selkirk will be the first to go.
  • June 2, 1911: Territorial Secretary David R. Macfarlane has hired foremen for road-building projects: Simon Feindel for the road leading from Carcross to the Big Thing Mine; William McAdam for the Robinson-Watson-Wheaton road; William Donnenwerth and "Web" Webster for the Whitehorse-Yukon Crossing road. They will hire their own men and start work next week.
  • June 2, 1911: A cabin about a mile south of Ear Lake was recently robbed of about $30 worth of clothes, bedding and eatables, the property of E. J. Hamacher who had a wood camp there last winter.
  • June 16, 1911: Civil engineer H. L. Robbins arrived at Haines on the Dolphin to set up an office for the Alaska Midland Railroad project. A great deal of development and construction work will soon be done.
  • June 30, 1911: There are 20 cases of smallpox at Dawson. Whitehorse has been unsuccessful in getting a quarantine established, and 25 refugees from Dawson were allowed to land on June 28th.

July

  • July 28, 1911: The minister of justice recommends to reduce the number of judges in the Yukon from 3 to 1.

August

  • August 4, 1911: Major A.E. Snyder, commander of the Yukon division of the R.N.W.M.P., leaves the north.
  • August 11, 1911: The new steamer Casca under construction at the B.Y.N. shipyards since fall 1910, is launched August 5. The Casca is entirely new from stern to stern with the exception of her boilers which were used for a short time in the old Casca.
  • August 25, 1911: For the first time in the history of Whitehorse music was furnished in one of her churches, the church of England, last Sunday morning by a fully vested choir of young boys. Rev. Blackwell has organized a good choir and is justifiably proud of the results.
  • August 25, 1911: Having taken retirement discharge from the service of the Royal N. W. M. P., Dr. L. A. Pare, after a residence of twelve years in the territory, all but one of which was spent in Whitehorse, left Wednesday morning for Fort McLeod, Alberta, where he will visit relatives for a few weeks, after which he will make an extended visit to Paris and other European points of interest. Read the entire article here.
  • August 25, 1911: The Midland Railroad. The party which left Haines, Alaska, a month ago for the purpose of meandering the route of the railroad it is proposed to build from salt water at Haines to Fairbanks by way of the Porcupine, the Kluane, the head of the White river and down the Tanana, completed the trip to the head of the Tanana last week. Read the entire article here.

September

  • September 29, 1911: Frederick Tennyson, Liberal, and Dr. Alfred Thompson, Conservative, are nominated for the Yukon Council. Dr. Alfred Thompson wins the October 23 election.

October

  • October 27, 1911: Two new gold dredges are installed by the Yukon Gold company: No. 6 on Bonanza and No. 7 Eldorado.

1912

January

  • January 5, 1912: "Mrs. Idelle Cochran, wife of Howard Cochran, who, with his partner, Theo. Becker, is operating the Whirlwind mine in the Wheaton district, died on Wednesday, December 27th, four hours after giving birth to a girl baby." Although she was buried in Whitehorse, there is no record of her. See more about Howard & Idelle Cochran and daughters.
  • January 26, 1912: George Armstrong is mourning the loss of one of his domesticated foxes, the black one, which escaped from its environment nearly two weeks ago by gnawing a hole in the wire netting which formed the enclosure. As it was the black fox of the pair, the loss to Mr. Armstrong is quite heavy as the skin would have brought him a very fancy price - anywhere from $400 to $750. Read that article and much more in The History of Fox Farming in the Yukon Territory.

February

  • February 2, 1912: George Black is appointed Commissioner of the Yukon.
  • February 2, 1912: The big Caterpillar traction engine being used to haul wood across Lake Bennett to the power plant of the Big Thing Mining company at the mouth of McDonald Creek went through the ice near the mouth of the Watson River. The machine, which was owned by Frank Asam, weighed 16 tons and cost $15,000. It is in over 80 feet of water, and it is not believed that the machine can be recovered.
  • February 9, 1912: A human skeleton wrapped in canvas, found on the shore of Wolf Lake, about 70 miles east of Teslin Post, is thought to be that of J. M. Danielson, though neither he nor his brother have been seen since the Fall of 1910.
  • February 16, 1912: The winter freight and mail division of the WP&YR received 44 horses on the train which arrived in Whitehorse on February 14.

March

  • March 8, 1912: C. E. S. Burch, inventor and builder of the Burch Auto sleigh, took a party out for a trial spin at Carcross a few days ago when the machine proved to be a great success.
  • March 8, 1912: There is enough activity by various miners in the Whitehorse copper belt that The Tyee Copper Company smelter at Ladysmith, BC, is running a display ad noting that they "Pay the Best Price for Copper, Gold and Silver Ores."
  • March 8, 1912: The 11-acre Holland ranch, at Sunnydale near Dawson, has been sold by the public administrator to John Whiteside and Mr. Harrod of Sunnydale, for an average of $400 an acre. The price shows that Yukon has land that is highly valuable for farming purposes. Few lands devoted to such purposes bring better values anywhere.
  • March 22, 1912: George Black is on his first official visit of the Yukon from Ottawa.

April

  • April 12, 1912: E.C. Hawkins, the first general manager of the White Pass & Yukon Route, died in New York on April 9.
  • April 12, 1912: Major Snyder quits the Royal N.W.M.P. after 27 years service.
  • April 19, 1912: Three candidates, William Drury, Captain P. Martin and Willard Leroy Phelps are nominated for the Yukon Council election, Whitehorse district.

May

  • May 10, 1912: "The work of establishing the international boundary line between Alaska and Yukon will be completed this year in time to permit of the survey parties getting out by the latter part of September."
  • May 10, 1912: In the election for 2 members to represent Whitehorse district on the board of the Yukon council, Captain P. Martin receives 153 votes, W. L. Phelps 112 votes and W. Drury 99 votes.
  • May 10, 1912: With the Yukon River open from Lower Lebarge to Dawson, when small boats from Whitehorse reached the frozen lake, "forty to fifty Indians with dog teams were waiting on the edge of the lake ice to transport the passengers and freight across the lake. Several amusing stories are told of how contracts were made and broken by the Indians."
  • May 17, 1912: "Yukon's Greatest Need Is An Overland Trail", starting with a "Passable Automobile Road from Whitehorse to Carmacks"
  • May 17, 1912: An epidemic of measles at Dawson is a great threat to Indians in particular, as they are particularly susceptible to the disease.

June

  • June 7, 1912: Scores of Alaskans have been duped in Florida land purchases that turned out to be worthless land in the Everglades.
  • June 14, 1912: Mount Kamai on the West coast of Alaska is in eruptions and sprinkles white ashes over parts of the Yukon.
  • June 21, 1912: "Taylor & Drury, the well-known firm of merchants and general traders, have taken over the Carmacks trading post, including the merchandise and roadhouse business, which concerns have been run since last fall by W. H. Shaw and C. B. Rowlinson and previous to that time by Seymour Rowlinson, who is now engaged in the stationery business in Victoria."

July

  • July 26, 1912: On July 21, a barge being pushed by the steamer Dawson hit the bank of the Thirtymile River. Two wagons carrying parts for a Caterpillar to be used in building the Scroggie Creek road were thrown into the river and lost.

August

  • August 16, 1912:Major John D. Moody, accompanied by his wife, arrived Friday on the way from Regina, headquarters of the Royal N. W. M. P., to Dawson, where he will relieve Major Fitz J. Horrigan as chief officer of the force in Yukon. Major Moody was in Yukon in 1898, coming in via the Edmonton route for the purpose of demonstrating the "All Canadian route" which failed to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the average argonaut. On turning over the office to Maj. Moody, Maj. Horrigan will leave for the outside after twelve years residence in Yukon.
  • August 16, 1912: One morning at the depot recently while a search for gold dust was being conducted by the police a concealed weapon in the shape of a thirty-eight calibre revolver was found on the person of Joseph Tiano, an Italian who had only arrived from Dawson on the way outside. The fellow was taken into custody and luter brought before Police Magistrate Taylor, where he was given an option of paying a stiff fine or going to jail for thirty days. He 'came across' with the money and went his way, the weapon being confiscated to the crown. Indian Drowned
  • August 16, 1912: Indian Drowned. Charles Nassack, better known as John Nassack, was drowned at the Chilcoot cannery yesterday noon. Three natives were in the canoe when it capsized, but Nassack was too old and feeble to make shore with the other occupants.
  • August 30, 1912: Some History of Local Copper Belt. Read the entire article here.

1913

January

  • January 3, 1913: The trail of a huge sulphur-smelling serpent monster was followed for several miles by a party of trappers and hunters east of Marsh Lake. The trail of a similar beast was followed in that area 3 years before, and Indian legends tell of one at Miles Canyon that destroyed a village and ate many people 300 years ago. Read the entire article here.
  • January 10, 1913: $5,250,000 is the output in 1912 of the gold-bearing creeks around Dawson. This is an increase of almost one million dollars compared to 1911.
  • January 31, 1913: "Three Persons Found Cold in Death at Black Hills Stage Post on Whitehorse-Dawson Road." Read two articles about the double murder and suicide here.

February

  • February 14, 1913: White Pass & Yukon Route announces they will build two new steamers for use on the lower Yukon river (Dawson - Fairbanks).
  • February 21, 1913: The King's Cafe is opened in Whitehorse February 16.

March

  • March 7, 1913: Work for the season started at the B. Y. N. shipyards Monday morning, March 8rd, earlier than for many years. While the crew at work is not large at present, it will be greatly increased by the middle of next week and from that time on, perhaps until fall, the yards will be the busiest place in Southern Yukon, with two new steamers being built for the lower Yukon run.
  • March 7, 1913: Adam Dickson, lineman for the Dominion Telegraph at Tagish, arrived on Sundays train and went at once to the hospital where parts of two toes were amputated by Dr. Clarke. Dickson had his toes frozen while out on the line during the severe weather of January and had been doctoring them himself until he realized that they were beyond saving, He will be out in about three weeks.
  • March 14, 1913: Bill Drury reports that the stampede to Silver Creek, 30 miles back from the east end of Teslin Lake, is not justified - he neither saw nor heard any valid reports of any gold being found.
  • March 21, 1913: Despite Bill Drury's report last week, the headline today is "Teslin Stampede Is Of Big Proportions".
  • March 21, 1913: The United States law pertaining to private drinking cups in railway trains is now in force on the White Pass road and those germ-laden distributors of disease are cached away when the train crosses the line from Canada into the domain of Uncle Sam. There is no law, however, against raising a car window and grabbing a handful of snow to allay the craving of a parched tongue following a night of revelry.

April

  • April 18, 1913: The steamship Princess Sophia hits a rock and goes ashore on Sentinel Island April 13. Nobody is injured.

May

  • May 2, 1913: Over 200 men are at work at the B.Y.N. shipyards, many of them building 2 new steamers, the Alaska and the Yukon.
  • May 2, 1913: Flamboyant former Yukoner Charles Eugene "Count" Carbonneau has again been arrested for fraud, this time in Paris.
  • May 2, 1913: G. P. Colwell, of St. Johns, New Brunswick, representing the Fundy Fox Farming Co., after spending several weeks in Skagway and Southern Yukon, has decided to locate here where a fox farm will be arranged for and conducted. Read that article and much more in The History of Fox Farming in the Yukon Territory.
  • May 30, 1913: Whitehorse druggist H.G. Macpherson was among the people who staked claims on Meander Creek, east of the Hootalinqua River, as the result of a gold discovery.
  • May 30, 1913: Carl Faulk, pioneer fox farmer in the Yukon, having begun about 5 years ago, has returned from the Canyon area on the Kluane trail with 16 fox puppies for his operation at Carcross.
  • May 30, 1913: Mrs. Ruth Kelsey died on May 28 as the result of burns sustained when a bottle of gasoline exploded at her Dominion Hotel on May 17. The hotel was destroyed in the fire. Read several articles here.

August

  • August 1, 1913: The richest discovery of placer in the North in the last years is reported from the creeks tributary to the Tanana river, Sushana, Bonanza, Eldorado and Flat.

November

  • November 7, 1913: John Burke, member of the Yukon Order of Pioneers and veteran of the Fortymile Circle, died on September 28.

December

  • December 19, 1913: A new camp developed over the summer of 1913 as the result of a stampede to the Chisana area.

1914

January

  • January 2, 1914: "Practically all the adult population of Whitehorse" attends the Grand Ball given by the lodge of the Loyal Order of Moose.
  • January 30, 1914: The steamship Princess Sophia runs once again ashore, this time at Alert Bay. Passengers are all transferred to the steamship Alki.
  • January 30, 1914: The U.S. Senate passes the Alaska railroad bill. The new bill contains a number of amendments, among others concerning the lease of the railroad and injured employees
  • January 30, 1914: Sir Richard McBride, premier of British Columbia, expresses his opinion in favour of annexing the Yukon.

February

  • February 20, 1914: Reverend John Hawsksley, rector of the Church of England at Dawson, is appointed Indian superintendent for the Yukon Territory, effective March 1.
  • February 20, 1914: The Southern Yukon Conservative Association, founded in Whitehorse in 1913, grows rapidly. It has 81 members and is at that time the largest club of the kind in the history of Whitehorse and Southern Yukon.

March

  • March 6, 1914: The real estate building on Front Street known as the Captain H.F. Siewerd property, is purchased by E.J. Hamacher who will occupy the building as a photograph gallery and art studio.

April

  • April 10, 1914: The Yukon Council sends a memorial to Ottawa emphasizing the importance of road between Skagway and Whitehorse. The Council receives support from the Southern Yukon Conservative Association.
  • April 24, 1914: Whitehorse, from present indications, gives promise of becoming the center of one of the biggest industries of the present age, that of fox breeding and raising. Already one company has been formed, backed by a number of the most prominent men in the territory, and arrangements are under way for the formation of another which will likely be followed by others in the future. Read that article and much more in The History of Fox Farming in the Yukon Territory.

May

  • May 22, 1914: The boating season starts with the steamer Vidette.
  • May 29, 1914: Most of the business section of Atlin was destroyed by a fire on May 24.

August

  • August 21, 1914: Dr. Alfred Thompson, Yukon MP, leaves Dawson to go to war. He will serve as physician and surgeon in the British army.

September

  • September 25, 1914: Matthew Watson, owner of the store in Carcross, gets married to Miss McLaren September 14 in Dawson.

October

  • October 9, 1914: George J. Milton, general manager of the Five Fingers Coal Company at Tantalus, reports a very successful season, with new machinery installed and the quality of coal increasing with depth.
  • October 9, 1914: A lodge of the Yukon Order of Pioneers is formed at Whitehorse on October 2. The officers elected were: President, W. A. Puckett; Vice President, E. J. White; Secretary, W. W. Dickenson; Treasurer, W. C. Sime; Warden, C. H. Johnston; Chaplain, Isaac Taylor; Guard, Captain P. Martin.
  • October 16, 1914: "The steamer Lightning, with the Boyle Yukon contingent on board, is due here from Dawson tomorrow night. The company has not yet been mobilized nor will it be until the men reach Victoria. There are forty of them on the steamer."

November

  • November 6, 1914: O.L. Dickeson head of the White Pass & Yukon Route resigns from his position, effective January 1, 1915.

December

  • December 18, 1914: On December 12, the most disastrous fire in Skagway since the town was founded in 1897 occurs. Moore's Wharf and several buildings are burned to the ground.

1915

January

February

  • February 19, 1915: Both parties - Conservatives and Liberals nominate their candidates for the Yukon Council. The Conservatives nominate Dr. J.O. Lachappelle and Howard Pearse (North Dawson), W.G. Radford and Dr. A.J. Gillis (South Dawson), G.N. Williams and J. Turner (Bonanza), Archie Martin and John F. McCrimmon (Klondike). The Liberals nominate Paul Guite and W.J. O'Brien (North Dawson), Captain L.G. Bennett and N. Watt (South Dawson), F. Hales and D. Robertson (Bonanza), R.W. Fraser and M. Landreville (Klondike).On March 4, 1915, Edward A. Dixon (Conservative) and Willard L. Phelps (Liberal) are elected as Southern Yukon representatives for the Yukon Council. They defeat Patrick Martin. O'Brien and Guite win in North Dawson. South Dawson is won by Radford and Watt. Fraser and McCrimmon win the Klondike riding, Robinson and Williams the Bonanza riding.

March

  • March 12, 1915: The Southern Yukon Mining and Industrial Association is formed March 5.
  • March 12, 1915: New Councillor-elect Edward A. Dixon is Pioneer resident of the Yukon.

April

  • April 9, 1915: The Yukon sees the earliest breaking up of the ice on the Yukon, on March 6th.
  • April 16, 1915: Whitehorse gets an additional grant of $18,000 for the new hospital.
  • April 16, 1915: Whitehorse man J.H. Sherman completes his invention of a new block system for railroads. The present system of "blocking" trains has one small light to signal danger ahead. By the Sherman invention from three to six distinct electric bell signals, in addition to the light, are given.

June

  • June 11, 1915: A.E. Acland, inspector of the R. N.W.M.P., is transferred to Winnipeg.

September

  • September 17, 1915: Byron N. White, owner of several copper properties in the Whitehorse area, dies on September 12th.

October

  • October 1, 1915: Alex Gagoff shoots 4 WP&YR railroad crew members. The news of the tragedy is brought to Whitehorse by Gagoff himself. He is sentenced (October 22) to death by hanging - the execution was carried out on March 10, 1916.
  • October 22, 1915: Judge G. L. Taylor dies on October 21st.

November

  • November 12, 1915: "A bunch of Indians arrived in town Tuesday evening of this week with a big consignment of moose and mountain sheep meat. The former is being sold around town at 15 and the latter at 25 cents per pound. Some of the meat brought in by Indians has the appearance of having been towed a la drag from where it was killed."

December

  • December 10, 1915: The new General Hospital in Whitehorse is completed.

1916

January

  • January 7, 1916: Details are given of the death of Ginger Stewart of Whitehorse in the trenches of France on November 23, 1915.

February

  • February 18, 1916: Martha Black is elected a life member of the national chapter of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire of Canada.

March

  • March 10, 1916: "The Stroller", E.J. White, announces in his column that he is going to be leaving the Yukon after nearly 12 years in Whitehorse and a total of 16½ years in the territory.
  • March 17, 1916: A.M. Rousseau is now editor of The Weekly Star - the March 17th edition is the final one compiled by E.J. White.

June

  • June 16, 1916: Cassie Henderson, daughter of Robert Henderson, is married on the steamer Casca June 15.

September

  • September 1, 1916: The Conservatives win the prohibition plebiscite on August 30, in an extreme close election. The majority of 3 votes is contested by the Liberals. A recount is refused.
  • September 8, 1916: Thomas W. O'Brien, one of the pioneers of the Yukon, dies in Dawson August 24.
  • September 13, 1916: Joseph Whiteside Boyle of Dawson receives the honor of lieutenant-colonel in the Canadian militia. In December 1917, Joe Boyle is decorated in Petrograd with the Order of St. Staislaus for distinguished service in the transportation department of the Russian army in Galicia and Rumania.
  • September 15, 1916: There is an epidemic of measles among the inhabitants of the Indian village north of Whitehorse.
  • September 22, 1916: The new high school addition to the Whitehorse public school building is completed.

October

  • October 27, 1916: George Norris Williams is appointed administrator for the Yukon Territory, with the power and authority of the commissioner. Captain George Black still remains commissioner during his war service overseas.
  • October 27, 1916: The last river boats, The Dawson and Nasutlin, arrive in Whitehorse on October 23, closing the navigation season.

December

  • December 15, 1916: The 1916 mining season has been greater in the Atlin district than any other year since the big rush in 1898.

1917

January

  • January 5, 1917: During 1916 the exports from Southern Yukon amount to approximately $1,000,000, $94,000 being raw furs and the other $906,000 copper and other ores. All of the furs and about 50 per cent of the ores were exported to the U.S. and the remainder of the ores to smelters in British Columbia. January 12, 1917: White Pass & Yukon Route announces December 20, 1916 the construction of two new steamers to take care of its increasing tourist traffic between Caribou and Taku and on Atlin lake. January 26, 1917: The Boyle Yukon Motor Machine Gun Battery, recruited in Dawson, is awarded a military cross and military medals.

February

  • February 23, 1917: On February 21, a fire that broke out in the Yukonia hotel destroys an entire block of business houses. Among the burned building are the Yukonia, Pioneer, Bonanza and Cronin hotels, Sales' jewelry store and Pinska's clothing store.

June

  • June 15, 1917: The B.Y.N. steamer Tutshi is launched at Carcross, June 12, christened by Mazie Cochran.

July

  • July 6, 1917: Katherine Ryan, representing Whitehorse, takes the part of "Miss Canada" at a celebration in Skagway.

August

  • August 24, 1917: There is a new stampede, this time to a creek in the Hutshi Lake Region.

August

  • September 14, 1917: There are several successful fox ranchers in Southern Yukon, and some of them are located in the vicinity of Whitehorse. Two of the most up-to-date of these are the J. P. Whitney & Co. Black & Silver Fox Farm and the Whitehorse Silver Black Fox Co.'s farm, both of which raise not only foxes but also rabbits and Belgian hares to feed the foxes. Read that article and much more in The History of Fox Farming in the Yukon Territory.

November

  • November 2, 1917: The launch Falcon, which left here October 19th, was located at the mouth of the White river where they were held up by floating ice. The first class mail was forwarded on to Dawson in charge of Capt. Hoggan by single horse to Black Hills creek over the Henderson Divide, and the balance of the mail and express will be taken on to Stewart City where it will be met with teams of the White Pass company, now en route to that point from Dawson.
  • November 2, 1917: The Royal Mail auto running between Whitehorse and Champagne Landing left here Monday with Chauffer Hardy in the driver's seat.
  • November 2, 1917: President Elliott of the W. P. & Y. R., who had been here for several days, left Thursday morning for Carcross for the purpose of inspecting the Tutshi, the fine new passenger steamer of the company, built last summer to accommodate the tourist trade to Atlin, and which he had never before seen.
  • November 2, 1917: There was such a severe storm on Atlin lake the fore part of the week that the White Pass steamer Tarahne had to lay to at the dock until its abatement.
  • November 9, 1917: The public meeting at the N. S. A. A. hall Tuesday night was fairly well attended, a number of ladies being among those present. Chas. H. Johnston, president of the Whitehorse Conservative association, announced dissolution of that organization, with a view of forming a Unionist association in Southern Yukon, with which citizens, irrespective of party politics, could affiiliate. W. D. Gordon, Conservative, was then chosen unanimously as chairman of the meeting and H. G. MacPherson, Liberal, as secretary.
  • November 9, 1917: If the war should continue much longer, (which God forbid) the question of a possible shortage of food would become very grave. It is commonly understood that a considerable proportion of big game is wantonly destroyed during the winter, and as, in this territory, such a source of food would be invaluable in given circumstances, I respectfully suggest the adoption of the obvious remedy.
  • November 16, 1917: The future of the mines in the Whitehorse copper belt certainly looks promising. Among the positive news, development work at the Copper King mine has uncovered an extensive body of high grade bornite and copper glance ore on the 150 foot level.
  • November 16, 1917: Jake Fred and Frank Smith make a new gold strike at Dalton Post.
  • November 23, 1917: Miner George Russell Clark, who has been in the Yukon country for the past 19 years, claims to have invented a projectile with one-half greater penetrating power than any now in use and which will increase the range of the gun from which it is fired, with the same amount of powder now used as a charge, at least 30 per cent. He says that his invention, if adopted by the military and naval authorities, will revolutionize artillery warfare. He also has an invention in aeronautic machinery that he thinks is destined to astonish the world at some not distant date.
  • November 23, 1917: A quiet but pretty wedding was solemnized at the residence of Mrs. Ellen Evans in Port Arthur, when her third daughter, Lucy, was married to William Stephenson Drury of Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.
  • November 30, 1917: A northern blizzard, that dropped the mercury from 20 above to 20 below in a few hours, struck Whitehorse early Tuesday morning and has been busy ever since. Considerable snow fell in the early stages of the blow and has badly drifted in many places since.
  • November 30, 1917: The river closed at Whitehorse at about 2 a. m. yesterday, and at Yukon Crossing about the same time.

December

  • December 7, 1917: The parents of Frank Wilson have just received a letter from him in which he states he has so far recovered from his wounds, which were not serious, that he is now able to be around. The wounds were caused by shrapnel, and were received at the battle of Paschendaele ridge.
  • December 7, 1917: With a denial of his guilt and the words of the song "Jesus Loves Me, This I Know," his last earthly utterances, Roy Yoshioko stood on the gallows on November 23rd and his soul was plunged into eternity. He was executed in the jail yard at Dawson this morning before the break of day. He was convicted or murdering his wife Hisa at West Dawson in June. Her unborn child also died, and an Indian, Percy James, was also found dead at their home.

1918

January

  • January 4, 1918: Charley Chinnery, veteran White Pass stage driver between here and Dawson, after going through a month of 40 to 86 degrees below zero weather on his last round trip to the Yukon metropolis, arrived in Whitehorse unscathed by the Frost King on Tuesday of last week, only to go through the painful experience of having the tip of his nose frosted on the following Saturday while walking up Front street from the White Pass barns to the depot with the thermometer registering only 10 below zero.
  • January 4, 1918: Hundreds of telegrams were received on December 25th by the government from the temperance people throughout Canada, congratulating the ministers for passing the order-in-council Saturday which after April next means practically Dominion-wide prohibition.

February

  • February 1, 1918: Alfred Thompson wins the Yukon election for the member of parliament, defeating Frederick Congdon.
  • February 15, 1918: The Yukon Chapter of the I.O.D.E. elects its officers. Isaac Taylor is the regent, F. Wilson is the 1st vice regent, Miss Smith is the 2nd vice regent.
  • February 22, 1918: Canada removes the embargo against the export of tungsten and molybdenium. The removal allows the Yukon to export these ores.

April

  • April 5, 1918: The offices of commissioner and administrator at Dawson, assistant gold commissioner at Whitehorse, and mining recorder at Mayo and Glacier are abolished and the respective officers are dismissed, effective as of April 1st. Gold Commissioner George Mackenzie is the new administrator of the territory.

June

  • June 28, 1918: The first draft boys leave the Yukon for training camps; 95 men are enrolled in Yukon's quota of troops for overseas service.

July

  • July 26, 1918: With tender and impressive rites, all that is mortal of Mrs. Hugh Quinn Cutting (Bessie Lucile Cutting) was laid to rest the afternoon of July 15th in the Masonic cemetery at Dawson. The funeral was attended by hundreds of the best known of Dawson's people. The christening of her daughter was held the previous afternoon.
  • July 26, 1918: The embargo against the importation of fruit and other vegetables into the Yukon is another of the absurdities imposed upon the people of the Klondike by a board ignorant of the conditions of this remote district. Fruits and vegetables brought here from the coast are held up at this end because of the arbitrary ruling of some board thousands of miles away, and may rot before they are released, and possibly they never will be released.
  • July 26, 1918: Col. Joseph W. Boyle, formerly of Dawson, Y. T., who is connected with the Canadian troops, has been decorated by King Ferdinand of Rumania, for having saved prominent Rumanians from capture at the hands of the Bolsheviki.

August

  • August 2, 1918: The firm of Greime & Smith, dealers in men's clothing, furnishings, boots and shoes, for years one of the business standbys of Whitehorse, announce a clearance of their entire stock and their retirement from business.
  • August 2, 1918: Early Saturday morning Dawson John, an Indian, arrived in town and reported to the police that the day before he had accidentally shot and killed his hunting companion, Joe Jacky, another Indian, while the two were moose hunting on the McClintock river.

September

  • September 20, 1918: Jim Hall, former owner of claim No. 17, Eldorado, which produced more than 2 million dollars, commits suicide in Valejo, California.
  • September 27, 1918: The Carcross church, which lately has been closed for repairs, was re-opened for service on the 15th, Rev. John Hawksley officiating, and delivering a fine sermon. W. H. Simpson, who has been doing the repairs, is to be congratulated on the improvements he has made. The interior has all been beaverboarded, and a chancel and vestry added at the east end. The arrival of a stained memorial window will complete the edifice.

November

  • November 1, 1918 On October 24th, the Princess Sophia runs onto Vanderbilt reef in Lynn canal, 65 miles south of Skagway. Passengers remain on the vessel as there appears to be no danger. A day later, bad weather and enormous waves swept the Sophia across the reef, filling it up with icy water. The Princess Sophia sank within minutes, causing the death of more than 350 passengers.
  • November 1, 1918: Bishop Stringer receives a honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity at Wycliffe College for his missionary work in the Arctic, in particular on Herschel Island.
  • November 8, 1918: Whitehorse is the first community to hoist the governor general's flag in the north. Whitehorse receives this honor for the number of recruits sent to the front and for generous contributions to war relief work.

December

  • December 6, 1918: The I.O.D.E. room in the public library is officially opened on November 30.

1919

January

  • January 10, 1919: A monument to the memory of Southern Yukon men who died in the battle fields in Europe is unveiled at the cemetery December 8. The first donation towards the monument is made by Mr. and Mrs. E.J. White.
  • January 24, 1919: The Yukon Development League is organized in Dawson on January 21, 1919. The object of the organization is to secure development in the Yukon.

February

  • February 14, 1919: News from Dawson on January 30th that trapper Bob Levac narrowly escaped death when mauled by a grizzly near Fraser Falls in the Stewart River country. Intervention by his dog no doubt saved him, but the bear killed the heroic dog. Levac was able to reach Mayo, 20 miles away, by dog sled for assistance.
  • February 14, 1919: Venus Mine which was closed in 1918, is leased to Montana parties and resumes work June 1st.
  • February 14, 1919: A series of brief articles report on divers exploring the wreck of the Princess Sophia in search of more bodies. The bodies of two women have been spotted but recovery has not been possible.
  • February 28, 1919: A report from the British Air Ministry predicts that large freight airships, 1,100 feet long and capable of carrying 200 tons vast distances, will be a reality.
  • February 28, 1919: Juneau fur dealer Chas. Goldstein & Co. is offering $5-20 for wolf pelts, $35-37.50 for large lynx, and $50-100 for cross fox.

March

  • March 7, 1919: On Feb. 17 Peter Jackson, an Alaskan native of Klawock village near the town of Craig, shot and instantly killed the deputy U. S. marshal who had him under arrest, The murderer escaped and for several days evaded capture, but finally, when he found that his apprehension by the authorities was certain, turned the gun on himself and thus ended the affair.
  • March 7, 1919: Monday afternoon about 3 o'clock fire was discovered in the attic of the Chooutla Indian school at Carcross, and for a time it looked as though the entire structure was doomed. Owing, however, to the aid of the citizens of Carcross, who rushed to the scene as soon as the alarm was given, the blaze was gotten under control with only slight damage to the roof of the building. There was also some damage occasioned by water.
  • March 14, 1919: A grand reception to welcome our returned soldiers was held at the Caribou hotel, Carcross, on Thursday last. The guests of honor were Aubrey Simmons, Fred Maclennan, Ike Gillespie and Alf. Dickson. There were 47 present, which consisted of the entire population and then some.
  • March 21, 1919: Billy Taylor, former superintendent of the river division of the White Pass & Yukon Route Company, died in Seattle on March 15.

April

  • April 18, 1919: A strike of rich ore is made at the Copper King mine.
  • April 18, 1919: Between 200 and 250 Inuit children are left orphans by an influenza epidemic.
  • April 25, 1919: The Yukon Chapter of the I.O.D.E. gives a reception and dance at the N.S.A.A. hall on April 24th in honor of Canadian and American returned soldiers.

June

  • June 20, 1919: Saturday night the owners of automobiles of this place met and formed an organization to be Known as The Southern Yukon Automobile Club. J. C. Newmarch was elected president, Dr. A. P. Hawes, secretary-treasurer, W. A. Puckett, Isaac Taylor and L. B. Davis, members of executive committee.
  • June 20, 1919: E. J. Hamacher left Sunday in his launch Whitehorse for the mouth of Big Salmon with a supply of gasoline for the White Pass mail boat in eharge of Ike Seavers, which was lvid up there on account of lack of fuel. Mr. Hamacher returned on the Casca Wednesday, leaving his launch at Big Salmon to be brought back by the steamer Dawson.
  • June 27, 1919: With over 200 visitors the "Festival of Midnight Sun" is a great success.

July

  • July 4, 1919: The steamers Casca and Yukon returned on June 30th. They had sailed on June 18th with about 70 tourists each, bound for Fort Yukon on a Midnight Sun tour.
  • July 4, 1919: On July 1st, 50-year-old Pete Peterson, a brakeman on the Scotia Bay-Taku_ portage railway line between Taku and Atlin lake, was instantly killed at Scotia Bay by being run over by an engine.
  • July 4, 1919: After thoroughly overhauling, repairing and repainting his new purchase, the speedy gasoline launch "Twilight," W. L. Phelps had Robt. Lowe haul the boat to the head of Miles Canyon by team Sunday afternoon and then ran it 80 miles to Carcross.
  • July 18, 1919: The White Pass Hotel changes hands and is now under the management of Mrs. Viaux.
  • July 25, 1919: The steamer Selkirk sailed for Dawson on the 18th, towing the barge Tahkeena which, carrying 157 tons of rails and fittings, is destined for Alaska Railroad construction at Nenana.

August

  • August 1, 1919: The Yukon Territory, during the war, contributed more money per capita to the various relief funds than any other province in Canada.

September

  • September 5, 1919: All bars are closed in Dawson on September 2nd. The Weekly Star writes: The "closing of [the] bars [is] marked by freedom from dunkeness".
  • September 12, 1919: Telephones are installed along the telegraph lines: Carmacks, Yukon Crossing, Selkirk, Beaton's Wood Camp, Coffee Creek and Stewart City have now phones.

October

  • October 10, 1919: The last steamer of the season is the Nasutlin, leaving Dawson for Mayo on September 30.
  • October 10, 1919: The Royal Alexandra hotel in Dawson is re-opened.
  • October 17, 1919: James P. Rogers, superintendent at White Pass & Yukon Route for seven years, died in Spokane, Washington, on October 8th.

December

  • December 12, 1919: "Buzzsaw" Jimmy Richards severely injures his leg with a revolving saw while investiging the machinery without shutting the power off.
  • December 19, 1919: The Prince of Wales honour flag, awarded to Whitehorse for generous contribution to the 1919 Victory Loan, is flying at the top of the Canadian Bank of Commerce flag pole on December 15.


Continue to January 1920