Hiking at Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC

I expect that many people camp at Nairn Falls Provincial Park while they’re using the vast network of mountain biking trails around Pemberton. For me, the hike to Nairn Falls was the draw.

The sign to the right at the start of the trail says: “Nairn Fall, 1.5 Km. This trail traverses steep banks above a swift flowing river. Stay on the trail and keep a close watch on children. Sturdy footwear is recommended.” Other signs advise that bicycles are not allowed, and dogs must be on leash.

Trail to Nairn Falls at Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
The trail is excellent when there are very few people here. An interpretive sign points out that Nairn Falls Provincial Park is home to the rubber boa, the only boa constrictor found in Canada. Only 45 cm (18 in) long, they live in the forest litter and feed on small rodents.

Trail to Nairn Falls at Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
The Green River was at maximum flow – a great time for waterfall viewing.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
By the time you get near the falls, the trail is far above the river.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
The roughest part of the trail for anyone with challenges (including the woman with twins in a stroller that we saw) is just before reaching the falls.

Trail to Nairn Falls at Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
The first view of the Nairn Falls viewing area. We started at the upper level.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
Nairn Falls isn’t very large, but the power of the water roaring through a twisting, multi-drop canyon of granite is very impressive. At low water levels, a granite bridge and some sections where part of the river flows under the granite can be seen/

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
To the L’íl’wat people, Nairn Falls is a spiritual place called Yélmícw. Their stories tell of the land being re-shaped by supernatural beings called “Transformers.” They left a trail of distinctive boulders, rock formations, lakes, rivers, mountains, and waterfalls. At Yélmícw, Elastic Man’s cave is behnd the lower falls, and a Transformer’s footprint can be seen in the granite at an ancient L’íl’wat fishing spot below the falls.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
Looking straight down into a slot off to the side side of the main canyon.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
Then we went down to the lower viewing area.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
The lower drop of Nairn Falls. There are actually more drops below, but they aren’t accessible.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
Bella and Tucker showed me how to navigate the granite up from the viewing area back to the trail. I was much slower than them 🙂

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
Looking up to the upper viewing area as we walked back to the trail.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
About 45 minutes after starting down the trail, we were back at the parking lot. It’s quite small and when it gets busy won’t be very big-rig friendly.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC
The kids were ready for a nap, so before getting dinner ready, I made the short drive into Pemberton to do some grocery shopping.

BC Highway 99 south of Pemberton
The rough old logging town of Pemberton is long gone. It has a very “yuppy” feeling to it – “Whistler North”.

Pemberton, BC

The plan for the next day was to drive to Lillooet for a 2-night stay.



Comments

Hiking at Nairn Falls Provincial Park, BC — 2 Comments

  1. I enjoy your travels so much. I live in Florida and was lucky enough to travel to Alaska last summer in a motorhome. Loved every minute even the scary events that happen on the road. BC is a beautiful place and hope to go back one day in the motorhome.

    • Thanks, Linda – I’m pleased that you’re enjoying this adventure. The variety in BC is incredible, and even this 10 weeks is just scratching the surface of what’s out there to be seen.